Church of the Redeemer

Potsdam, Germany

The Protestant Church of the Redeemer (Heilandskirche) is famous for its Italian Romanesque Revival architecture with a separate campanile (bell tower) and for its scenic location. It was built in 1844. The design was based on drawings by King Frederick William IV of Prussia, called the Romantic on the Throne. The building was realized by Ludwig Persius, the king's favorite architect. The church is situated on the bank of lake Jungfernsee, 300 metres south of Sacrow Manor at the edge of its park, designed and expanded in the 1840s by landscape architect Peter Joseph Lenné. Both church and manor were restored in the 1990s. This area of lakes, forests, parks, and castles has been classified as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

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Address

Fährstraße, Potsdam, Germany
See all sites in Potsdam

Details

Founded: 1844
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Horst Jaße (3 years ago)
Heilandskirche in Sacrow bei Potsdam, schöner Ausblick auf die Havel und zur Glienicker Brücke
Max Sch (3 years ago)
Wohl eine der am schönsten gelegenen Kirchen die ich kenne. Hier kann man raus fahren oder wandern und einfach mal die Seele baumeln lassen.
Manfred Wese (3 years ago)
Zu Mauerzeiten nur aus der Ferne zu betrachten kann man sie heute besuchen. Die Kirche, wie auch der angrenzende Schlosspark sind unbedingt einen Besuch wert.
Borka T (3 years ago)
Not so much things to do in this park. It was a little bit boring. I thought I will get lost because grass is so high so I couldn't see the roads where these are. Also, I think not so many people is interesting to visit this place. I live close to it so that's why I visit this place. There is a parking which is free. No shops around, only small restaurant and flower shop.
Alexander Flensburg (3 years ago)
Really cool location of this church!
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