Ghent City Museum

Ghent, Belgium

The Ghent City Museum (STAM) exposes the city history. With respect to the collection that is shown, the history of this museum goes back to 1833, the year in which the Oudheidkundig Museum van de Bijloke in Ghent was founded. In 1928 the museum was situated in the Bijloke abbey - this led to the name Bijlokemuseum.

With the Bijloke collection as base and the Bijloke abbey and Bijloke monastery as buildings, the STAM functions as a modern-day heritage forum. Parts from other collections were added to the Bijloke collection. In connection to the historical buildings a new entrance building was constructed, designed by Ghent's city architect Koen Van Nieuwenhuyse.

The main circuit of the Ghent City Museum serves as a museal and multimedial introduction to a visit to the city of Ghent. The past of the town is illustrated, but also today's life and the future are discussed. The temporary STAM collections describe the phenomenon of 'urbanity' by means of contemporary issues. STAM refers the visitor to the city itself and to Ghent's cultural heritage.

Eyecatching parts of the museum are the sky picture of Ghent (300 m² large) on which the visitors can walk around, and software with which Ghent can be viewed in detail and over the course of four centuries. In the Bijloke abbey that can be accessed through a passerelle in glass, the history of the city is told by means of three hundred objects. Views on Ghent is another multimedial application: a screen shows a city view from the year 1534, floor-plans from 1614 and 1912 and a sky picture from the present. There is also a room for temporary exhibitions.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 2010
Category: Museums in Belgium

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

little prince (18 months ago)
Nice museum. It was closed for renovation for a while and now it looks much better than before. Got a nice outside space and a café for people to chill around. The garden on the inside is beautiful. Good collection. Definetly worth a visit.
Valerio Montanari (18 months ago)
A very nice museum. Basically all information was in 4 languages (EN, FR, NL, DE). The museum is informative, interactve, interesting, well-made, modern. It is not very big: you can see the entire museum in around 3 hours. The only downside: it costs 10€, that's maybe a few Euros too many. Still, I fully recommend.
Anna Buevich (19 months ago)
Very nice museum, always enjoying to go there. Perfectly organised, amazing level of client assistance, adorable collection and cool interactive.
Tamu Suttarwala (19 months ago)
I'd suggest a visit at the end of your stay in Ghent, once you've gotten acquainted with the city, to see its past in fascinating detail.
Kristof Riebbels (20 months ago)
Nice, cool museum about Ghent. Corona proof as possible. Multiple languages, ... Also good for children.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.