Ghent City Museum

Ghent, Belgium

The Ghent City Museum (STAM) exposes the city history. With respect to the collection that is shown, the history of this museum goes back to 1833, the year in which the Oudheidkundig Museum van de Bijloke in Ghent was founded. In 1928 the museum was situated in the Bijloke abbey - this led to the name Bijlokemuseum.

With the Bijloke collection as base and the Bijloke abbey and Bijloke monastery as buildings, the STAM functions as a modern-day heritage forum. Parts from other collections were added to the Bijloke collection. In connection to the historical buildings a new entrance building was constructed, designed by Ghent's city architect Koen Van Nieuwenhuyse.

The main circuit of the Ghent City Museum serves as a museal and multimedial introduction to a visit to the city of Ghent. The past of the town is illustrated, but also today's life and the future are discussed. The temporary STAM collections describe the phenomenon of 'urbanity' by means of contemporary issues. STAM refers the visitor to the city itself and to Ghent's cultural heritage.

Eyecatching parts of the museum are the sky picture of Ghent (300 m² large) on which the visitors can walk around, and software with which Ghent can be viewed in detail and over the course of four centuries. In the Bijloke abbey that can be accessed through a passerelle in glass, the history of the city is told by means of three hundred objects. Views on Ghent is another multimedial application: a screen shows a city view from the year 1534, floor-plans from 1614 and 1912 and a sky picture from the present. There is also a room for temporary exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: 2010
Category: Museums in Belgium

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ed J Brown (19 months ago)
It's a really great museum. Possibly the best city museum I've been to. Very comprehensive and interesting.
Loránt Vincze (19 months ago)
Great and entertaining museum. I could have walk around for hours. The crime exhibition seemed particularly interesting and intriguing.
Sean Broughton (19 months ago)
Loved the museum. Not a criticism in the slightest, but If you're not a Flemish or French speaker then the audio guide is essential as there are no English signs. The map room showing aerial views of the whole city is particularly good.
Denver (20 months ago)
Beautiful museum with a fascinating exhibition on the city of Ghent and another on crime and the police that investigate them. The exhibition on the museum of crime is temporary and well worth the visit. The cost of the visit is included in your ticket to the main exhibition. The permanent exhibition costs 2 euro for youth under 26 and barely more for adults. Throughout the rooms, it shows how Ghent evolved from prehistoric settlements to Gaelic invasion all the way to today. It is wonderfully curated and entertaining. NOTE: plan several hours for your visit. The interactive parts of the exhibition will keep you busy for long.
Bobby Allen (2 years ago)
This museum is fascinating! It gives a great peek into the history of Ghent and it’s enjoyable to wander the buildings and grounds of this old hospital zone and imagine what it must have been like 100’s of years ago. There are some cool LEGO towers here, and interesting exhibitions- I just wish I had seen the English language booklet for the crime exhibition sooner.
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