Verdala Palace was built in 1586 during the reign of Hugues Loubenx de Verdalle, and it now serves as the official summer residence of the President of Malta.

The site of Verdala Palace was originally occupied by a hunting lodge, which was built in the 1550s or 1560s during the reign of Grand Master Jean Parisot de Valette. The lodge was built in the Boschetto, a large semi-landscaped area that was used by knights of the Order of Saint John for game hunting. The hunting lodge was expanded into a palace in 1586, during the reign of Hugues Loubenx de Verdalle. It was further embellished in the 17th and 18th centuries, during the reigns of Giovanni Paolo Lascaris and António Manoel de Vilhena.

During the French blockade of 1798–1800, the palace served as a military prison for French soldiers captured by the Maltese or British. During British rule, it became a silk factory, but it was eventually abandoned and fell into a state of disrepair. Some repairs were undertaken during the governorship of Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby, and it was fully restored by Governor Sir William Reid in the 1850s. Prior to its restoration it was a temporal minor hospital between 1915 and 1916. It subsequently became the official summer residency of the Governors of Malta. On the outbreak of World War II in 1939, works of art from the National Museum were stored at the palace for safekeeping. The palace was restored in 1982 and began to be used to host visiting heads of state.

Verdala Palace was designed by Girolamo Cassar, a Maltese architect mostly known for the design of many buildings in the capital Valletta. The palace is an example of Renaissance architecture, and its design is possibly influenced by Villa Farnese in Caprarola.

The building has a rectangular plan, with pentagonal bastion-like turrets on each corner. The building itself has two floors, while the corner turrets are about five storeys high. The entire structure is also surrounded by a stone quarried ditch. Although the turrets and ditch gave the palace the outward appearance of a fort, they were mainly symbolic, and the palace was never really intended to withstand any attack. Nonetheless, the palace was still armed with four pieces of artillery on the roof. The interior of the palace is very ornate, with frescoes on some of the ceilings.

A chapel, stables and servant quarters are located a short distance away from the palace.

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Siġġiewi, Malta
See all sites in Siġġiewi

Details

Founded: 1586
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Malta

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ginger Ginger (2 months ago)
Love this place, it has nice views and it is well kept. wish to visit again soon!
Liam Taliana (4 months ago)
Excellent tour of the place. Guide was informative and to the point. Castle is well kept however certain paintings and rooms need restoration. A memorable experience and I will recommend to others.
Nikolina Linca (8 months ago)
We have visited Verdala Palace as there was a Magical Illuminated Trail and it was awesome! Perfect place to take your kids and enjoy Christmas lights and music.
yasmine abela (9 months ago)
Lovely atmosphere, protocols adhered to.
Claudine Zammit (9 months ago)
Walk-thru illuminated trail. Lovely outing for all the family. Yiu can also have some delicious food and sweets and warm drinks. Seasons greeting to everyone
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