Basilica of Sant'Abbondio

Como, Italy

The current edifice of Basilica of Sant'Abbondio rises over a pre-existing 5th century Palaeo-Christian church entitled to Sts. Peter and Paul, built by order of St. Amantius of Como, third bishop of the city. Erected c. 1 km outside the city's walls, it was intended to house several relics of the two saints which Amantius had brought from Rome.

The basilica acted as bishop's seat until 1007. Six years later bishop Alberic moved the seat within the walls. The basilica was then entrusted to the Benedictines who, between 1050 and 1095, rebuilt it in Romanesque style. The new edifice was dedicated to Amantius' successor, Abundius. The structures of the Palaeo-Christian church, discovered in 1863 during a restoration, are still marked by black and pale marble stones in the pavement.

The new basilica had a nave and four aisles. It was consecrated by pope Urban II on June 3, 1095.

The church has two notable bell towers rising at the end of the external aisles, in the middle of the nave. The sober façade, once preceded by a portico, has seven windows and a portal. Notable is the external decoration of the choir's windows. There are also Romanesque bas-reliefs and, in the apse, a notable cycle of mid-14th-century frescoes. Under the high altar are the Abundius' relics.

The medieval monastery annexed to the church, recently restored, will act as the seat of the local faculty of Jurisprudence.

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Details

Founded: 1050-1095
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emmanuel Ramirez (19 months ago)
This is the second oldest church according to our guide. Unlike so many churches in Europe, which are often a mixture of various styles, here one finds quite a rather unaltered Romanesque construction. The Basilica, built in the 11th century over an even older church as has been found out by recent excavations, is aesthetically very pleasing - from the exterior as well as inside. There are also some wall paintings, although they date from the 14th century. In the middle are the relics of Saint Abbondio, a local bishop, and of two of his successors, rather unknown saints elsewhere. Next to the church is a courtyard, recently restored, which now gets used by the town's university
filip321 (2 years ago)
Astonishing view and great architecture!
M (2 years ago)
Beautiful and worth to visit
Robert Dammers (2 years ago)
Fascinating. The second-oldest cathedral in Como, built on the foundations of the oldest.
Aneta Nováková (2 years ago)
To feel silence and peace - come in.
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