Église Saint-Polycarpe

Lyon, France

The Église Saint-Polycarpe (Church of St. Polycarp) is the oldest church of the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri. The church, built by the Oratorians installed on the slopes, was completed in 1670, with the exception of the façade that was built in 1756 by architect Toussaint Loyer who also lengthened the nave.

On 19 June 1791, the Oratory Church became a parish church and took the name of St. Polycarp, as a tribute to Polycarp of Smyrna, master of Saint Pothinus and Irenaeus, who were the first two bishops of Lyon. The church has a famous organ, built by Augustine Zeiger in 1841.

The church has a facade decorated with four Corinthian pilasters topped by a triangular pediment. Louis Janmot made the painting depicting the Last Supper which is placed in the apse.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1670
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Florence Falconnet (2 years ago)
Church of the canuts whose choir was dug into the hill. Holds the heart of Pauline Jaricot and that of Abbé Gourdiat. Pauline Jaricot's body is in the Saint Nizier church. TO VISIT, especially if you are interested in the period of the 19th century.
Florence Falconnet (2 years ago)
Church of the canuts whose choir was dug into the hill. Holds the heart of Pauline Jaricot and that of Abbé Gourdiat. Pauline Jaricot's body is in the Saint Nizier church. TO VISIT, especially if you are interested in the period of the 19th century.
Tiger Chan (2 years ago)
Old quaint church
Tiger Chan (2 years ago)
Old quaint church
thierry lasnier (4 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.