Église Saint-Polycarpe

Lyon, France

The Église Saint-Polycarpe (Church of St. Polycarp) is the oldest church of the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri. The church, built by the Oratorians installed on the slopes, was completed in 1670, with the exception of the façade that was built in 1756 by architect Toussaint Loyer who also lengthened the nave.

On 19 June 1791, the Oratory Church became a parish church and took the name of St. Polycarp, as a tribute to Polycarp of Smyrna, master of Saint Pothinus and Irenaeus, who were the first two bishops of Lyon. The church has a famous organ, built by Augustine Zeiger in 1841.

The church has a facade decorated with four Corinthian pilasters topped by a triangular pediment. Louis Janmot made the painting depicting the Last Supper which is placed in the apse.

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Founded: 1670
Category: Religious sites in France

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Florence Falconnet (5 months ago)
Church of the canuts whose choir was dug into the hill. Holds the heart of Pauline Jaricot and that of Abbé Gourdiat. Pauline Jaricot's body is in the Saint Nizier church. TO VISIT, especially if you are interested in the period of the 19th century.
Florence Falconnet (5 months ago)
Church of the canuts whose choir was dug into the hill. Holds the heart of Pauline Jaricot and that of Abbé Gourdiat. Pauline Jaricot's body is in the Saint Nizier church. TO VISIT, especially if you are interested in the period of the 19th century.
Tiger Chan (14 months ago)
Old quaint church
Tiger Chan (14 months ago)
Old quaint church
thierry lasnier (3 years ago)
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