St-André-le-Bas Church

Vienne, France

The abbey of Saint-Andre-le-Bas was founded in the 8th century by Duke Ansemund. The church was originally a chapel of the palace of kings of Burgundy built in the end of the 9th century. The abbey flourished in the High Middle Ages. 

The troubles of the Hundred Years' War and the competition of the new religious orders reduced the power of the convent and it was unable to recover from the Wars of religion. The monastery was dissolved in the late 18th century. The abbey church, built in the 11th century, became a parish church and the convent buildings were sold and partly dismembered. The church, the bell tower and the cloister are still remarkable for their harmonious Romanesque sculpted ornementation.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.vienne-tourisme.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

tessier legraveur (10 months ago)
C'est un lieu magique
Olivier Gardian (10 months ago)
Un cloître magnifique, niché dans un espace de quiétude. Le lieu est encore plus beau lors des expositions.
Magdalena Hrdina (12 months ago)
À s'y perdre
Chantal MANGIN (12 months ago)
Très intéressant. L'était tout autant avant sa restauration,qui toute fois permet une grande lisibilité et une plus grande séduction quand il est eclaire.
Adrian Jelfs (3 years ago)
Beautiful cloister Direction signing could be much improved!
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