Fort du Mont Alban was built by order of Emmanuel Philibert, Duke of Savoy, between 1557 and 1560 and is one of the most exemplary French military architectural structures dating back to the 16th century.

The purpose of its construction was to reinforce the defense line considerably debilitate as a result of the siege of Nice (in 1543). But what is striking about Fort du Mont Alban is it has survived, as said, in good condition, despite the fact it was considerably affected in World War II.

At present, Fort du Mont Alban is one of the best lookouts on the French Riviera. This feature is owed to its location on a 220 meters high hilly region from where visitors can see virtually the entire Nice at west and Baie des Anges at east.

Fort du Mont Alban stands out as an excellent daytrip idea for people who vacation in Nice.

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Founded: 1557-1560
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roeland Heirbaut (3 months ago)
Great sight, a bit smaller then anticipated but a nice view over the city on top of the hill with good accesibility
Marina Barros (3 months ago)
Spectacular view, one of the best in the world, do not miss it.
Lorenzo (4 months ago)
Impressive fortress up on the Mount Boron. Unfortunately entrance of the fortress is prohibited but one can still roam around it and enjoy the breathtaking view
Ed Lee (4 months ago)
Took close to an hour steady walk here from St Roch. Well worth the effort. Such a shame there’s not a cafe there.
Camil Mateescu (5 months ago)
Wonderfull view.
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