Museum of Art and History

Geneva, Switzerland

The Musée d’Art et d’Histoire (Museum of Art and History) is the largest art museum in Geneva. It was built by the architect Marc Camoletti between 1903 and 1910, and financed by a bequest from the banker Charles Galland (1816–1901).

The façade is decorated with sculptures by Paul Amlehn: an allegory of the arts, depicting painting, sculpture, drawing and architecture, is mounted on the triangular gable above the entrance, and two more allegories, of archaeology and applied art, can be seen in the left- and right-hand corners of the building respectively.

The fine art section has paintings from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, with works by the Italian, Dutch, French, English, Genevan and Swiss Schools. The best-known painting is The Miraculous Draught of Fishes (1444) by Konrad Witz, contained in Witz's St. Peter Altarpiece. Other major artists include Rembrandt, Cézanne, Modigliani, and the sculptor Rodin. The museum also has numerous works by Jean-Étienne Liotard, Ferdinand Hodler, Félix Vallotton and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot.

The applied art section has collections of Byzantine art, icons, weapons from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, silverware and tinware, musical instruments and textiles. The complete interior furnishing and wood panelling from several rooms of the Lower Castle Zizers (late 17th century) have been built into the museum.

The archaeology section displays findings from European prehistory, ancient Egypt (with a mummy from the 9th century BC), the Kerma culture of Sudan, the Near East, ancient Greece, and Roman and pre-Roman Italy, as well as a numismatic cabinet.

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Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Museums in Switzerland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ana Luta (37 days ago)
Amazing exhibitions. The entrance is free. They have guides in multiple languages. Highly recommend!
zack hatch (2 months ago)
Really interesting museum with a broad collection of artwork, sculpture, antiques and architecture. Well worth the visit and is free!
Maab Bahzer (4 months ago)
The museum had great exhibits. I enjoyed looking at the the historic weaponry and armor, unfortunately most information displays are written only in french so I struggled to read them. In general I loved the exhibits and I just wish I could read everything because it was gorgeous.
Tímea Balog (10 months ago)
It is beautiful! I recommend to visit. It is free.
Leon L (2 years ago)
I like the place. very good. quite. You can always find something interesting.
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