Vaksala Church

Uppsala, Sweden

The grey-stone church of Vaksala was built in the 12th century. Two chapels were added in the 15th century. The altar, biggest in the Uppland diocese, was made in Antwerpen around the year 1500. The pulpit was carved in 1795.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.svenskakyrkan.se

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Nilsson Restaurang kocken och kallskänkan (2 years ago)
Most modern farm I've been to with memorable moments with my restaurant chef and the cold bar Fullerö
Britt Alm (2 years ago)
Tough, but beautiful.
Eric A.L. Axner (3 years ago)
A beautiful and atmospheric church with an equally splendid churchyard. Very close to the bustling city but still surrounded by a rural setting.
DRAGIN (3 years ago)
Otroligt vacker, värdefull och fin.
Jan Ivarsson (3 years ago)
A perfect place for all religious rites Baptisms, Marriages, Funerals.
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