Pavillon Le Corbusier

Zürich, Switzerland

The Pavillon Le Corbusier is a Swiss art museum dedicated to the work of the Swiss architect Le Corbusier. In 1960 Heidi Weber had the vision to establish a museum designed by Le Corbusier – this building should exhibit his works of art in an ideal environment created by the architect himself in the then Centre Le Corbusier or Heidi Weber Museum. It is the last building designed by Le Corbusier marking a radical change of his achievement of using concrete and stone, framed in steel and glass, in the 1960s created as a signpost for the future. Le Corbusier made intensive use of prefabricated steel elements combined with multi-coloured enamelled plates fitted to the central core, and above the complex he designed a 'free-floating' roof to keep the house protected from the rain and the sun.

The Centre Le Corbusier can be considered a Gesamtkunstwerk, i.e. a total work of art, and reflects the harmonic unity of Le Corbusier's architecture, sculptures, paintings, furniture designs and his writings, which is unique and possibly the only one such existing structure in the world.

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Details

Founded: 1967
Category: Museums in Switzerland

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Uziel González (3 years ago)
The museum still close
Zeglar (3 years ago)
An interesting interpretation of Corbusier's architecture and themes. Colourful foil to the neighbouring buildings, beautifully loacted in a park setting.
Adriana Perez (3 years ago)
I couldn't get in because it's closed for renovations and even when it is open, the hours are very odd. I was able to see the architecture from the outside and it was interesting to see the colors and the integration of modern styles typical of Le Corbusier. It is a great tribute to a famous Swiss architect that played such a major role in the history of architecture. I would have liked to see the inside.
Jan Willem Kooijmans (3 years ago)
Very interesting to see how this lovely restaurant integrated a Le Corbusier design into the architecture. Placed along the Zürichsee boulevard makes a beautiful location. Parking is not far away, or even better take a bicycle! On the inside and on the outside you can taste the Corbusier design. The house, the furniture and other elements gives you a very insight about the legacy of Le Corburier. And on top of that, the cakes are fabulous! Absolutely worth a visit on a lazy and sunny afternoon.
patriciatruzzi (4 years ago)
It's closed until April 2019 for renovations. It would be very nice to inform or on the website.
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