Zagreb Modern Gallery

Zagreb, Croatia

Modern Gallery holds the most important and comprehensive collection of paintings, sculptures and drawings by 19th and 20th century Croatian artists. The collection numbers around 10,000 works of art, housed since 1934 in the historic Vranyczany Palace in the centre of Zagreb, overlooking the Zrinjevac Park.

The Palace underwent a complete renovation between 1993 and 2005, when the current exhibition was opened to the public. Two floors of the palace have become a modern-equipped gallery showing the permanent collection of Croatian modern painting and sculpture. In the completely refurbished historic rooms, the Modern Gallery presents 'Two Hundred Years of Croatian Fine Arts (1800-2000)', a representative selection of 650-700 of the best works by painters, sculptors and medal makers.

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Details

Founded: 1905
Category: Museums in Croatia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Deniz Turan (3 months ago)
Only small part of museum is open for now.
Reinaldo Gabay (5 months ago)
The Modern Gallery of Zagreb is another museum you should not miss during your visit to Zagreb. Il holds permanent and temporary exhibitions of croatian painters and sculptors of the last two centuries. A very recent (Jan. 2021) and excellent exhibition that ended at the end of January was the one dedicated to dalmatian-born painter Jerolim Miše. Museum has a small store in the lobby and the entrance is around 40 kn (5,35 euros). It is conveniently located, diagonal to Zrinjevac Park, easily accesible from Glavni Kolodvor (2 blocks away) and Trg Josip Jelacic (10 min walk).
Aleksandar Norsic (5 months ago)
Definitely must see gallery in Zagreb. Nice collection of Croatian painters.
Per Pintaric (11 months ago)
Worst museum I've ever been to. After the earthquake the Modern Gallery decided to protest not receiving sufficient funds for the rebuild - and they did it by moving ALL the paintings into 2 rooms, throwing them on top of one another, 100% no curation involved. Of course the entry ticket prices haven't changed though.
Darko Bavoljak (13 months ago)
Ok
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