Visby City Wall

Visby, Sweden

The City wall of Visby (Swedish: Visby ringmur) is an old medieval defensive wall surrounding the city. The building of ringwall was probably started in the 13th century. Around 1280 it was rebuilt to reach its current height, along with the addition of its characteristic towers (although some towers were not constructed until the 15th century) It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site in Visby. The war in 1288 between the citizens of Visby and the Danish army gave the citizens of Visby a reason to continue the work with the wall. All together the city wall became 3.4 km, and it was finished in the beginning of the 14th century. At the time, the wall contained 29 towers, 27 of which are remaining today.

During the 1361 Battle of Visby, the main battle was fought within 300 meters of the North Gate of Visby (shown on the right). The peasant forces were ultimately unsuccessful, however, resulting in the citizens of Visby surrendering to the Danish forces.

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Address

Norra Murgatan, Visby, Sweden
See all sites in Visby

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

D A (4 years ago)
Unique
Pete K (4 years ago)
Historic place.
Ram Nekkanti (4 years ago)
It’s awesome:) worth visiting
Gav Riddleston (4 years ago)
How anyone can review this as under 5 is shocking. The houses built into churches and walls. The beauty oozes out in full. Food and people are stunning.
Rezaul Haque (4 years ago)
Fantastic place for the visitors. Parking place is there for two hours FREE! Very close to the port.
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