St. Michael the Archangel's Church

Gdynia, Poland

St. Michael Archangel church is the oldest building in Gdynia. Originally built by nuns of the Norbertine Order, it replaced a pagan temple in 1224. The church was reduced to a pile of rubble during the war with Sweden in 17th century. After its restoration it served the Catholics until the last days of World War II when the tower was hit by a Soviet cannon ball, fired for fun. Yet again did the Kashubians have to rebuild their temple. It towers the Kępa Oksywska up to over 40 m above the water table, surrounded by a cemetery. Very many honourable people from Gdynia and Pomerania rest there; it also makes a Pantheon of the Navy: the walls of this historic church are lined with commemorating plates honouring the II World War Polish warships, graves of the outstanding navy commanders and the September 1939 defenders of the Polish Coast, holders of the Virtuti Militari crosses.

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Arciszewskich 2, Gdynia, Poland
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Founded: 1224
Category: Religious sites in Poland

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