Olympic Stadium

Helsinki, Finland

The story of Olympic Stadium began in 1927, when City of Helsinki and several sport associations created the Stadium Foundation. The purpose of foundation was to build an adequate venue for the summer olympics. Construction of the Olympic Stadium began in 1934 and it was completed in 1938. It was designed in functionalistic style by the architects Yrjö Lindegren and Toivo Jäntti.

The stadium was built to host the 1940 Summer Olympics, which were moved from Tokyo to Helsinki before being cancelled due to World War II. After 12 years delay the XVth Olympic Games were finally held in Helsinki Olympic Stadium in 1952. The stadium was also the venue for the first World Athletics Championships in 1983 as well as for the 2005 World Championships in Athletics. It is also the home stadium of the Finland national football team.

Olympic Stadium is still in active use. The National Sports Museum is also situated to the stadium and the 72 meters high tower is popular place to see the nice view over the downtown of Helsinki.

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Details

Founded: 1934-1938
Category:
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

maxin john (9 months ago)
Historically significant
Anrijs Skenderskis (10 months ago)
Gonna be great stadium when it's finished
Tomáš Matoušek (11 months ago)
Nice park, but reconstraction
Sue Clark (14 months ago)
It was under construction and you really couldn't see anything other than 2 statues. Very disappointed
Oráiste Naranja (2 years ago)
We went here in the hope of both seeing the Olympic stadium and perhaps having a glimpse of the famous eagle owls that are on the area. Neither happened. The stadium was being renovated and you could not get too close to it. And the Finnish bird group are quite rude and never reply to any emails regarding getting help to see the birds. Very disappointed.
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