Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Copenhagen, Denmark

The University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden (Botanisk have) covers an area of 10 hectares and is particularly noted for its extensive complex of historical glasshouses dating from 1874. The garden is part of the Natural History Museum of Denmark, which is itself part of the University of Copenhagen Faculty of Science. It serves both research, educational and recreational purposes. The botanical garden was first established in 1600 but it was moved twice before it was ultimately given its current location in 1870. It was probably founded to secure a collection of Danish medicinal plants after the Reformation had seen many convents and their gardens abandoned or demolished.

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Founded: 1874
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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claus Skånvad (10 months ago)
Her kan man spille ingress
Glenn Schutt (11 months ago)
Lidt for kedeligt til mig
Christian Holm Christensen (3 years ago)
OK playground
Chris Nash (3 years ago)
Dogs love it here
Mattias Ericson (3 years ago)
Really liked the calm atmosphere
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