Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Copenhagen, Denmark

The University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden (Botanisk have) covers an area of 10 hectares and is particularly noted for its extensive complex of historical glasshouses dating from 1874. The garden is part of the Natural History Museum of Denmark, which is itself part of the University of Copenhagen Faculty of Science. It serves both research, educational and recreational purposes. The botanical garden was first established in 1600 but it was moved twice before it was ultimately given its current location in 1870. It was probably founded to secure a collection of Danish medicinal plants after the Reformation had seen many convents and their gardens abandoned or demolished.

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Founded: 1874
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Denmark

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tom Pedersen (2 years ago)
Evergreen, certainly a nice place in the summer. Can use a loving hand. Tomski
T B (3 years ago)
A lovely little secret sensory garden where only the imagination sets limits.
Kara Sofia Fink Gustafsson (5 years ago)
Nice but could use some kind of rippling water
Flemming Ernst (5 years ago)
Nice and calm place to relax/explore, not much visited.
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