The Noorderkerk ('northern church') was built between 1620–1623 to serve the rapidly growing population of the new Jordaan neighbourhood. The Jordaan already had a church, the Westerkerk, but the city government decided that a second church should be built to serve the northern part of the neighbourhood. The Noorderkerk became the church for the common people, while the Westerkerk was used mainly by the middle and upper classes.

The architect was Hendrick de Keyser, who also designed the Zuiderkerk and Westerkerk, among others. After de Keyser's death in 1621, his son Pieter de Keyser took over and oversaw the completion.

While the Zuiderkerk and Westerkerk have a more traditional basilica design, the Noorderkerk has a symmetrical, cross-shaped layout, reflecting the ideals of the Renaissance and protestantism. De Keyser's unique design combines an octagonal floor plan with a structure shaped like a Greek cross, with four arms of equal length. Annex buildings occupy each corner of the cross, and a small tower sits in the centre of the cross. Large Tuscan pillars dominate the church interior. The bell tower was built in 1621 by J. Meurs.

The church is still used for Dutch Reformed Church services and is also used regularly for classical music concerts.

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Founded: 1620-1623
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J. PEROZ (2 years ago)
Great Kerk in Amsterdam, especially when some special event are organised in there ✅. Went there in July 2022, for an artistic light representation of Van Gogh and Rembrandt.
Dr Win Sutanto (2 years ago)
A small but beautiful protestant church in Amsterdam, occasionally used for exhibitions (recently, Vincent Meets Rembrandt)
C. I. (3 years ago)
Attended “Vincent meets Rembrandt” here, it was magical to watch in a church..
Jaap Houweling (3 years ago)
Visited the Noorderkerk for the exhibition ‘Vincents meets Rembrandt’ which has been a breathtaking experience!
Boyko Dimitrov (3 years ago)
An immersive 360-degree exhibition Vincent meers Rembrandt
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