Tallinn Song Festival Grounds

Tallinn, Estonia

The Tallinn Song Stage (Lauluväljak) was built in 1959 for the Estonian Song Festival. The stage was meant to hold over 15,000 singers but it’s also possible to use it the other way – the performance will take place in front of the stage and audience is sitting on the stage.

The stage was the main places of the Estonian revolution and new independence in 1988-1991. Estonians gathered there to sing patriotic hymns in what became known as the Singing Revolution that led to the overthrow of Soviet rule.

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Details

Founded: 1959
Category:
Historical period: Soviet Occupation (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mario Karu (6 months ago)
Great place to just walk around. Especially great during Estonian song festival time, soo many people coming to this place.
Sven Täveby (7 months ago)
This is truly one of the best outdoor arenas in Europe. A bit like Waldebühne in Berlin, but without seating. Food services differ from artist to artist...
Rasmus Karits (8 months ago)
This place has had a great impact on Estonian history and independence.
Gordon Lee (10 months ago)
Guns and Rose's concert was great. Entry and exit was fast and efficient as was the food. Bars were really slow as was merchandise
Juho Äännevaara (10 months ago)
Perfect venue for music concert events! You can sit or lay down on grass with perfect view to the platform. We went to see Guns 'n Roses. Other offerings were not that good but that' s entirely up to the organizer.
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