Tallinn Song Festival Grounds

Tallinn, Estonia

The Tallinn Song Stage (Lauluväljak) was built in 1959 for the Estonian Song Festival. The stage was meant to hold over 15,000 singers but it’s also possible to use it the other way – the performance will take place in front of the stage and audience is sitting on the stage.

The stage was the main places of the Estonian revolution and new independence in 1988-1991. Estonians gathered there to sing patriotic hymns in what became known as the Singing Revolution that led to the overthrow of Soviet rule.

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Details

Founded: 1959
Category:
Historical period: Soviet Occupation (Estonia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Merili Aasma (6 months ago)
Singing under the dome is epic feeling taking part of singing festival. Õllesummer was "must visit" summer fest. Probably best place to be when taking part of concert is under dome-less chance for rain or having good view.
Luca Brasi (9 months ago)
Unique, holds a special place in the hearts of estonians
Tarmo Tarbe (10 months ago)
It's my best big concert place.
Anton Kostjuk (13 months ago)
Was working on the reconstruction of this place , was fun,had a lot of good memories and ? work time's
Kai-Kristel Ehala (17 months ago)
It is a beautiful place. In winter you can do winter activities with sled, snowboard, skies and etc. In summer you can enjoy concerts, walks and other festivals.
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