Bellevue Palace

Berlin, Germany

The immaculately-looking white neoclassical palace on the Spreeweg, just off the Tiergarten’s northwestern corner is the official residence of the German President. The palace was erected in 1786 as a private residence for Friedrich the Great’s youngest brother Prince Ferdinand of Prussia as three-winged palace ideally situated on the Tiergarten hunting grounds. It was designed by architect Philipp Daniel Boumann. Over the centuries it became a school under Kaiser Wilhelm II (1888 – 1918) – the last German Kaiser – and a Reich guesthouse in 1939. The round arched windows of the side wings were converted from the original side entrances. The present building is the 1959 reconstructed version and only one room the Oval Saal (Oval Office) from Carl Gotthard Langhans is original. The President’s offices are located in the new building, the Bundespräsidialamt, south of the Palace, a contrasting glass and black granite edifice under heavy guard.

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Address

Bellevue-Ufer, Berlin, Germany
See all sites in Berlin

Details

Founded: 1786
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matt Clarke (2 years ago)
Lovely well maintained palace - great views from every angle
Ronald Halim (3 years ago)
The seat of the german president. Surprisingly not as fancy as the other palaces you find in Germany. Massive garden.
Annie Casalista (3 years ago)
Nice to sit in front of the Palace with someone you love
David Lenz (3 years ago)
Beautiful sight, easy to stop by and look at, but one cannot go inside. Tourists can dedicate about 5 minutes, but it's not a must.
Ali Alkhubuoli (3 years ago)
The presidential residence. Nice atmosphere around and lovely place to visit highly recommended as a sightseeing before you going to visit the victory column, but nothing else to do beside that. Just enjoy the history of this place.
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