Belvédère Castle

Brussels, Belgium

Belvédère Castle is a Belgian royal castle in Laeken which currently houses Albert II of Belgium and his wife Queen Paola of Belgium. Belvédère was originally built in the 1780s, but the castle was bought by King Leopold II in 1867. The castle was meant for his sister Carlotta of Mexico, but she chose to live in Tervuren which left Belvédère empty for a while. In 1890 a fire broke out in the Royal Palace of Laeken and King Leopold and his wife Marie Henriette of Austria moved to Belvédère while repairs took place. Once the repairs were finished Leopold and Carlotta moved back to the Royal Palace, while Belvédère became the residence of their youngest daughter, Princess Clementine. She lived in Belvédère until her father died and she got married, leaving the castle for the Royal Palace. From there the castle was occupied by different members of the royal court.

In 1958 the palace was used for exhibitions during the World Expo. The following year the newlyweds Albert II and Paola moved to Belvédère, which expanded to 12 acres, having acquired parts of a local park. All three of the royal couple's children were born and raised in Belvédère. After the couple became the monarchs of Belgium, they stayed at the castle instead of moving to the Royal Palace.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1780s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lars R (11 months ago)
Sehr hübsch
Juan Carlos Lacruz (12 months ago)
No se puede entrar.
Laurent Leenders (2 years ago)
Domaine Royal non accessible au public
Bosco BUSSET Y Burons (2 years ago)
Lugar con encanto, muy interesante historia
Stéphane Collard (2 years ago)
J'aime bien ma nouvelle résidence.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Aarhus Old Town

The Old Town in Aarhus, Denmark (Den Gamle By), is an open-air town museum consisting of 75 historical buildings collected from 20 townships in all parts of the country. In 1914 the museum opened as the world's first open-air museum of its kind, concentrating on town culture rather than village culture, and to this day it remains one of just a few top rated Danish museums outside Copenhagen.

The museum buildings are organized into a small town of chiefly half-timbered structures originally erected between 1550 and the late 19th century in various parts of the country and later moved to Aarhus during the 20th century. In all there are some 27 rooms, chambers or kitchens, 34 workshops, 10 groceries or shops, 5 historical gardens, a post office, a customs office, a school and a theatre.

The town itself is the main attraction but most buildings are open for visitors; rooms are either decorated in the original historical style or organized into larger exhibits of which there are 5 regular with varying themes. There are several groceries, diners and workshops spread throughout the town with museum staff working in the roles of town figures i.e. merchant, blacksmith etc. adding to the illusion of a 'living' town.