Igreja de São Roque

Lisbon, Portugal

The Igreja de São Roque (Church of Saint Roch) in Lisbon was the earliest Jesuit church in the Portuguese world, and one of the first Jesuit churches anywhere. It served as the Society’s home church in Portugal for over 200 years, before the Jesuits were expelled from that country. After the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, the church and its ancillary residence were given to the Santa Casa da Misericórdia de Lisboa (the Charity House of Lisbon) to replace their church and headquarters which had been destroyed. It remains a part of the Santa Casa today, one of its many heritage buildings.

The Igreja de São Roque was one of the few buildings in Lisbon to survive the earthquake relatively unscathed. When built in the 16th century it was the first Jesuit church designed in the “auditorium-church” style specifically for preaching. It contains a number of chapels, most in the Baroque style of the early 17th century. The most notable chapel is the 18th-century Chapel of St. John the Baptist, a project by Nicola Salvi and Luigi Vanvitelli constructed in Rome of many precious stones and disassembled, shipped and reconstructed in São Roque; at the time it was reportedly the most expensive chapel in Europe.

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Founded: 1506
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nat Án (2 years ago)
Stunning and amazing ceiling! Unique!
Vasily Tregubov (2 years ago)
Nice decorated
David Rumary (2 years ago)
Quite dark and very box shaped. Nice on-square kiosk / Café with toilets available
Pedro Fernandes (2 years ago)
Awesome place to visit! Has the best and most beautiful painted ceiling I've seen to date. We had the luck to be able to visit the attic, above the ceiling and also to see the view from the balconies upon Lisbon. I recommend everyone to visit!
Colin B (3 years ago)
All churches in Portugal are wonderful but amongst them all this particular one stands out for its rich and ornate fittings. You will marvel at the inlaid marble that will remind you of those you will have seen in Florence if you have ever visited. The wall tiles are beautiful. I was lucky enough to be there when the organ was being played it made the visit even better. Please visit and please don't forget to leave a donation.
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