Freisaal Castle

Salzburg, Austria

The scenic Freisaal Castle dates from the Middle ages. The oldest record of the building dates back to 1392. The name is derived from 'Freudensaal', meaning 'pleasure hall'. Its original purpose was just that: to serve as a pleasure castle for Prince Archbishop Pilgrim II. von Puchheim. Ernst von Bayern re-modelled the building in 1549.

A fundamental change in the building′s structures was caused by construction work done in 1907, which transformed Freisaal Castle into a somewhat messed up villa. However, frescos in the second floor by Hans Bocksberger the older from 1558 remained preserved, one of the paintings showing Prince Archbishop Michael von Kuenburg moving into Salzburg. Today, Freisaal Castle is private property and is not open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.visit-salzburg.net

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Heinrich Falkenberg (2 years ago)
Unfortunately, you cannot visit the castle from the inside. Very nice architecture.
Franco Schöndorfer (3 years ago)
Unfortunately, the beautiful complex can only be admired from the outside.
Franz Kodim (3 years ago)
Great building
Robert Franks (3 years ago)
Pretty little (private) castle with a moat.
Petr Nekvinda (4 years ago)
Nice
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