Sofia Church, named after Sofia of Nassau 1836-1913 (Queen of Sweden 1872-1907), is one of the major churches in Stockholm. It was designed during an architectural contest in 1899, and was inaugurated in 1906.

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Details

Founded: 1906
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

dj J-SUS (2 years ago)
Recomended !!!
Matt Clegg (2 years ago)
This was a beautiful stop on our vacation to Stockholm. We spent the morning enjoying the view of the city and having breakfast on a bench outside the church. I would highly recommend a quiet morning spent here.
Kanwal Tariq (2 years ago)
Free musical events almost every week
Martino 1981 (2 years ago)
A lovely park perfect for picnics.
Teo Gerald (3 years ago)
A must see church in Stockholm. Although it might not be the tallest or grandest church in Stockholm, the church is located uphill and it has a great view point. In addition, there are few historical huts surrounding the church. I was fortunate that the church member was playing organ when I visited. The walk to the church will bypass many interesting shops and restaurants. It's highly recommended for a visit.
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