The Håga Mound (Hågahögen) or King Björn's Mound is one of the most magnificent remains from the Nordic Bronze Age. Håga mound is approximately 7 metres high and 45 metres across and it was constructed ca 1000 B.C. by the shore of a narrow inlet of the sea (the land has been continually rising since the Ice Age). It was constructed of turfs that had been laid on top of a cairn which was built on top of a wooden chamber containing a hollow oak coffin with the cremated remains of a short man. During the burial there had probably been human sacrifice, the evidence for which is human bones from which the marrow had been removed.

The coffin contained rich unburnt bronze objects such as a Bronze age sword, a razor, two brooches, a number of thickly gilded buttons, two pincers and various other bronze objects. They may all come from the same workshop in Zealand. The mound was excavated 1902-1903 by Oscar Almgren together with the future king Gustaf VI Adolf. Only minor excavations have been done in the Bronze Age settlement but the area contains several house foundations in stone. The findings from Hågahögen were stored in The Swedish Museum of National Antiquities.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1000 BC
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Sweden
Historical period: Viking Age (Sweden)

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wilhelm 123 (3 years ago)
A beautiful place to rest, have a walk, a picnic or meditate. All the sheeps walking around is a bonus!
Rebecca ter Borg (3 years ago)
A place to take a simple escape from the city
Mpinga Nzima (3 years ago)
Great for walks in the woods
Christian Wallin (3 years ago)
Just a nice place for a relaxing walk, maybe I haven't been there though to really know the place but it's not that impressive, but it is very relaxing.
Jonatan Stanczak (3 years ago)
Natural reserve that always surprised and offers many hidden treasures and where the shifting seasons bring out their best. Great place for the casual stroller, the family looking for a perfect picknick spot or for the couple looking for hidden romantic spots.
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