Immeuble Clarté

Geneva, Switzerland

Immeuble Clarté is an apartment building in Geneva designed by Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret starting from 1928 and built in 1931-32. It has eight storeys and comprises 45 free plan units of diverse configurations and sizes. It is one of Le Corbusier's key early projects in which he explored the principles of modernist architecture in apartment buildings, which later led to the Unité d'Habitation design principle.

After it escaped demolition in the 1960s, the building was first renovated in the 1970s. After being again threatened with demolition in the early 1980s, in 1986 it was listed as a historic monument. In July 2016, the building and several other works by Le Corbusier were inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

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Founded: 1928-1932
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rafał Radomski (7 months ago)
Very impressive building
Paul P (2 years ago)
The Master at work. Unbelievable that it was constructed in 1932.
Josef Pirochta (2 years ago)
Wonderful piece of architectural history ;)
Christophe Lafougere (3 years ago)
Very nice building from LeCorbusier 1931. Impossible to visit apart from private tours from time to time like at the moment.
Paprika (4 years ago)
If you have the opportunity to visit, don't miss your chance
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