San Nazaro in Brolo

Milan, Italy

San Nazaro in Brolo church was built by St. Ambrose starting from 382 on the road that connected Milan (then Mediolanum) to Rome. It was originally dedicated to the Apostles, and thus known as Basilica Apostolorum.

As explained by an inscription in the church written by Ambrose himself, the church's plan was on the Greek Cross with apses on the arms, a feature present only in the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople. In front of the basilica was a porticoed atrium. Under the basilica's altar were housed the relics of the Apostles, which are still present. In 397, when the body of St. Nazarus was discovered, a new apse was created. Serena, niece of emperor Theodosius I, donated the marbles for the sacellum housing the relics and also embellished the rest of the church.

The apse of the right arm has a portal with a false porch. The ceiling of the nave, originally consisting of wooden spans, was replaced by a groin vault during the Middle Ages. The walls are original. Also in this age the Romanesque-style octagonal tambour, featuring a circular loggia with small columns, was added over the arms' crossing.

Starting from 1512, Bramantino built the Trivulzio Mausoleum, which obstructs the Palaeo-Christian façade.

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Founded: 382 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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Tony Popa (23 months ago)
The basilica of San Nazaro in Brolo or San Nazaro Maggiore is a church in Milan, northern Italy. The church was built by St. Ambrose starting from 382 on the road that connected Milan (then Mediolanum) to Rome. It was originally dedicated to the Apostles, and thus known as Basilica Apostolorum.
Tony Popa (23 months ago)
The basilica of San Nazaro in Brolo or San Nazaro Maggiore is a church in Milan, northern Italy. The church was built by St. Ambrose starting from 382 on the road that connected Milan (then Mediolanum) to Rome. It was originally dedicated to the Apostles, and thus known as Basilica Apostolorum.
Victor Juarez (2 years ago)
So much history at this site, it's part of the hidden Gems in Milan right next to the university
Victor Juarez (2 years ago)
So much history at this site, it's part of the hidden Gems in Milan right next to the university
Maria Correia (2 years ago)
I didn't got inside. Outside is like nice but not a monumental church.
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