San Nazaro in Brolo

Milan, Italy

San Nazaro in Brolo church was built by St. Ambrose starting from 382 on the road that connected Milan (then Mediolanum) to Rome. It was originally dedicated to the Apostles, and thus known as Basilica Apostolorum.

As explained by an inscription in the church written by Ambrose himself, the church's plan was on the Greek Cross with apses on the arms, a feature present only in the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople. In front of the basilica was a porticoed atrium. Under the basilica's altar were housed the relics of the Apostles, which are still present. In 397, when the body of St. Nazarus was discovered, a new apse was created. Serena, niece of emperor Theodosius I, donated the marbles for the sacellum housing the relics and also embellished the rest of the church.

The apse of the right arm has a portal with a false porch. The ceiling of the nave, originally consisting of wooden spans, was replaced by a groin vault during the Middle Ages. The walls are original. Also in this age the Romanesque-style octagonal tambour, featuring a circular loggia with small columns, was added over the arms' crossing.

Starting from 1512, Bramantino built the Trivulzio Mausoleum, which obstructs the Palaeo-Christian façade.

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Details

Founded: 382 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Emanuela Folco (16 months ago)
Very nice, very simple church.
Pablo Madrona (16 months ago)
Just another old church
Thomas Ozbun (2 years ago)
One of the oldest churches in the city, this 4th century building was later refurbished during the various centuries altering its original look. Despite not much left from its initial period it is worth to see particularly for the frescoed chapels and the impressive Cappella Trivulzio by Bramantino.
Lucas Keller (2 years ago)
Impressive church that hides its marvelous art behind a meagre front. Try to get in, it's a typical don't judge a book by its cover kind of thing.
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