San Vittore al Corpo

Milan, Italy

The church and monastery of San Vittore al Corpo was built by the Olivetan order in the early 16th century. The site once had a 4th-century basilica and mausoleum that once held the burials of the emperors Gratian and Valentinian III. The basilica was enlarged in the 8th century to house the relics of the saints Vittore and Satiro. A Benedictine monastery soon was attached to the church. In 1507, the monastery was transferred to the Olivetans, who began a major reconstruction.

During the Napoleonic wars, the site became a military hospital, and afterwards became barracks. It suffered damage during the bombardments of 1943. The monastery now houses a museum of science. Reconstruction of the church was begun in 1533 by Vincenzo Seregni, and completed in 1568 by Pellegrino Tibaldi. La façade remains incomplete. The dome was frescoed in 1617 by Guglielmo Caccia. In the chapel of St Anthony is a 1619 canvas by Daniele Crespi (Death of St Paul the hermit). In the transept on the left, is an early 17th-century cycle of canvases of the Stories of San Benedetto, by Ambrogio Figino while the right transept has an altarpiece by Camillo Procaccini. Other chapels have paintings by Pompeo Batoni and Giovanni Battista Discepoli.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Costantino Fabbretti (2 years ago)
Una basilica dallo stile rinascimentale tendente a virare verso il barocco. È bellissima, traboccante di affreschi e decorazioni stupefacenti. Una delle chiese più belle che ho visitato, da considerate che per 51 anni ho vissuto a Roma.
Maria Teresa Zanferrari (2 years ago)
Una chiesa che come altre in Milano, offre la sorpresa appena ne si varca la soglia. Stupendo l'interno, con affreschi da capo a piedi delle mura. A partire dal portone d'ingresso che racconta già da solo in a storia, per concludere con il coro e la sagrestia che sono spettacolari. Chi avesse l'opportunità di visitare questa chiesa, la troverà una chicca della Milano nascosta ai più, che racconta una parte di storia antica da apprezzare anche la parte degli scavi ed i sotterranei che sono visitabili grazie al supporto del TCI
Robbe Vandenbroucke (2 years ago)
Very nice church even though you wouldn't think when you see the facade. Very quiet and not crowded at all
Cal Light (3 years ago)
Beautiful church. Peaceful and not crowded.
Petr Svoboda (3 years ago)
This is one of the most beautiful churches I've ever seen!!! From the outside it looks very bad but inside it is breathtaking!
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