Sant'Angelo

Milan, Italy

Sant'Angelo was constructed in the mid-16th century by the Spanish general and Governor Milan Ferrante Gonzaga, over an edifice already existing in 1418, in replacement of the eponymous one, which had been destroyed to build the new walls. The design was by Domenico Giunti. The small bell tower was added in 1607, while the façade was finished only in 1630, in late-Mannerist or early-Baroque style. The church is one of the few in the city which was not restored in 'neo-medieval' style during the 19th century.

It has a single nave with side chapels and barrel vault, a transept and a deep presbytery. Artworks include works by Gaudenzio Ferrari, Antonio Campi, Morazzone, Simone Peterzano, Ottavio Semino, Camillo Procaccini and Giulio Cesare Procaccini. The triumphal arch has a frescoes with a solemn Incoronation of Mary by Stefano Maria Legnani.

In the transept is the tomb of Blessed Beatrice Casati, the wife and widow of Francino Rusca, the Earl of Locarno. She raised four children -- three sons and one daughter, the latter of whom placed this monument to their mother -- and was a devout member of the Franciscan tertiaries. She died in 1490.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hubert (7 months ago)
If you’re nearby, it’s worth to stooping by for 10-15 minutes. But the church is like hundreds I have seen. There was no tickets.
Ernesto DI CHIO (2 years ago)
CIAM1563 Christmas Concert Best wishes for happiness, peace and health for the Holy Holidays! PROSPEROUS2023
giorgi miqadze (2 years ago)
Beautiful
LouannaNEGUT Gmail (4 years ago)
One full holly great place ; EXQUISITE ;
Miran Špelič (5 years ago)
Beautiful church
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