Roman Walls of Córdoba

Córdoba, Spain

The Roman Walls which once surrounded Córdoba, Spain, were built after the Romans captured the city in 206 BC, making it part of the Roman Republic.

Built as fortifications soon after the Romans captured Córdoba, the walls stretched some 2,650 m, completely surrounding the city. They consisted of carefully cut stone with an outer wall of up to 3 m high and a 1.2 m inner wall flanking a gap 6 m wide filled with rubble. There were several semicircular towers along the walls. When the city received the status of Colonia Patricia under Augustus, the southern wall was demolished in order to extend the city limits to the river. Vestiges remain in the Alcázar, near the Roman bridge, and flanking the Avenida de la Ribera. The walls next to Calle San Fernando and Calle Cairuán (restored in the 1950s) also have a base from this period. A section of the Roman wall can be seen from the street next to the Roman temple.

Roman gates included the Porta Principalis Sinistra (later Puerta de Gallegos) on the west side not far from the Roman mausoleum. The arches next to the Puerta de Sevilla to the east are part of a Roman aqueduct.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 206 BCE
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carmita Salamanca Garcia (7 months ago)
Perfect place to walk the city.
Alicja J (12 months ago)
Very good location. Hostel is hidden in block of flats, close to the old town. In neighbourhood there are a lot cafeterías. Perfect for 1-2 nights. Everything is comfortable. The only inconvenience can be cats. If you don't like them, stay away, because they are present all around the flat.
عبد الشكور الماليزي (2 years ago)
The owner very friendly and helpful. The place very clean and good. Near to the mezquita and alcazar. I love the kittens too. The kitchen very clean and well organized. Thanks.
José Navalho (2 years ago)
It's clean, near police station, near historic center, cheap and cosy. We came from Portugal with motorbikes and stay here, and leave the bikes for 2 days in front of police station, the owner is a very kind woman, toilets very clean.
a a (3 years ago)
The room provided wasn't as described. There is not private toilets/bathroom. No air conditionning (only one room is equipped while there are 5 to 6 rooms, be lucky if you take a chance). No breakfast as announced. Apart from all this points, it is not a real hotel BUT its location is practical and it's cheap.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Ängsö Castle

Ängsö Castle was first named as "Engsev" in a royal charter by king Canute I of Sweden (r. 1167-1196), in which he stated that he had inherited the property after his father Eric IX of Sweden. Until 1272, it was owned by the Riseberga Abbey, and then taken over by Gregers Birgersson.

From 1475 until 1710, it was owned by the Sparre family. The current castle was built as a fortress by riksråd Bengt Fadersson Sparre in the 1480s. In 1522, Ängsö Castle was taken after a siege by king Gustav Vasa, since its owner, Fadersson's son Knut Bengtsson, sided with Christian II of Denmark. However, in 1538 it was given by the king to Bengtsson's daughter Hillevi Knutsdotter, who was married to Arvid Trolle.

In 1710, the castle was taken over by Carl Piper and Christina Piper. Ängsö Castle was owned by the Piper family from 1710 until 1971, and is now owned by the Westmanna foundation. The castle building itself was made into a museum in 1959 and was made a listed building in 1965. It is currently opened to visitors during the summers.

The castle is a cubical building in four stores made by stone and bricks. The lower parts is preserved from the middle ages. It was redecorated and expanded in the 1630s. The 4th storey as well as the roof is from the expansion of Carl Hårleman from 1740-41. It gained its current appearance in the 1740s.