Roman Walls of Córdoba

Córdoba, Spain

The Roman Walls which once surrounded Córdoba, Spain, were built after the Romans captured the city in 206 BC, making it part of the Roman Republic.

Built as fortifications soon after the Romans captured Córdoba, the walls stretched some 2,650 m, completely surrounding the city. They consisted of carefully cut stone with an outer wall of up to 3 m high and a 1.2 m inner wall flanking a gap 6 m wide filled with rubble. There were several semicircular towers along the walls. When the city received the status of Colonia Patricia under Augustus, the southern wall was demolished in order to extend the city limits to the river. Vestiges remain in the Alcázar, near the Roman bridge, and flanking the Avenida de la Ribera. The walls next to Calle San Fernando and Calle Cairuán (restored in the 1950s) also have a base from this period. A section of the Roman wall can be seen from the street next to the Roman temple.

Roman gates included the Porta Principalis Sinistra (later Puerta de Gallegos) on the west side not far from the Roman mausoleum. The arches next to the Puerta de Sevilla to the east are part of a Roman aqueduct.

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Founded: 206 BCE
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carmita Salamanca Garcia (3 years ago)
Perfect place to walk the city.
Alicja J (3 years ago)
Very good location. Hostel is hidden in block of flats, close to the old town. In neighbourhood there are a lot cafeterías. Perfect for 1-2 nights. Everything is comfortable. The only inconvenience can be cats. If you don't like them, stay away, because they are present all around the flat.
عبد الشكور الماليزي (4 years ago)
The owner very friendly and helpful. The place very clean and good. Near to the mezquita and alcazar. I love the kittens too. The kitchen very clean and well organized. Thanks.
José Navalho (4 years ago)
It's clean, near police station, near historic center, cheap and cosy. We came from Portugal with motorbikes and stay here, and leave the bikes for 2 days in front of police station, the owner is a very kind woman, toilets very clean.
a a (5 years ago)
The room provided wasn't as described. There is not private toilets/bathroom. No air conditionning (only one room is equipped while there are 5 to 6 rooms, be lucky if you take a chance). No breakfast as announced. Apart from all this points, it is not a real hotel BUT its location is practical and it's cheap.
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