San Lorenzo Church

Córdoba, Spain

San Lorenzo was one of the twelve religious buildings commissioned by king Ferdinand III of Castile in the city after its conquest in the early 13th century.

The church occupies the site of a pre-existing Islamic mosque, which in turn had been built above a Visigothic church. It was built between around 1244 and 1300, in a transitional style between Romanesque and Gothic architecture. It has the typical structure of Andalusian churches of the period, featuring a rectangular plan with a nave and two aisles, without transept and an apse.

It has a portico with three slightly ogival arcades, added in the 16th century. The Islamic minaret was converted into a Renaissance bell tower by Hernán Ruiz the Younger. Above the portico is the large Gothic-Mudéjar rose window. The nave has a coffered ceiling in Mudéjar-Renaissance style. The apse has 14th century paintings inspired by the Italian Gothic school, depicting Scenes of the Life of Jesus. There are also figures of saints and prophets with gilt halos, and a decoration imitating Byzantine azulejos. the high altar (17th century) has scenes of the life of St. Lawrence.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brendan Murphy (3 years ago)
Well worth seeing even if you are an atheist but aesthetically inclined!
Liz Wisely (3 years ago)
Pretty church in Córdoba loved the quiet interior
FRANCISC DIONISIE AARON (3 years ago)
Lovely church. One of the nine (others say twelve) churches built by Saint Fernando III after the conquest of Cordoba in 1236 A. D.
Rafael Garcia Caballero (4 years ago)
Ok
Oleg Naumov (5 years ago)
Wonderful monument of XV century Gothic Architecture. You are going to find excellent frescoes with the Christ Passions painted in first half of XV century here! Must see place at Cordoba!
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