Runestones U-970 & U-969 at Burial Ground

Uppsala, Sweden

These two stones are only a few meters apart on the side of a small burial mound at the side of an burial ground. Much of the burial ground is now used as pature for a 4-H Club.

U-970 Translation - 'Vide raised the stone after..(missing).. Öpir....'

Additional Info - Öpir is the runemaster who carved the stone and is one of the most prolific runemasters in the area. Both this stone and U #969, just a few feet away, had been damaged when rune researches made sketches of the stones in the 1600's

U-969 Rune Translation - 'Ragnvid raised the stone ..... his father. And Åsmund carved.'

Additional Info - Uppslands Rune Inscription sits at the edge of a burial ground dating from the latter half of the Iron Age. The top of the runestone (with the name of who it memorializes) had already been damaged when rune-researchers of the 1600's made drawings of the stone. This one was carved by Åsmund Kåressons, one of the most prolific runemasters in the area.

Information was translated from the placards in Swedish on site.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Viking Age (Sweden)

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