Herttoniemi Manor Museum

Helsinki, Finland

The history of Herttoniemi Manor dates back to the 16th century. The Herttoniemi area is probably named after Laurens Hertoghe who might have been the first owner of the manor. The heyday was in the late 1700’s, when the manor was owned by Augustin Ehrensvärd. He led the construction of Suomenlinna fortress.

The present main building originates from the beginning of 19th century, when the manor was owned by admiral Carl Olof Cronstedt. The old porcelain factory was changed as the new main building and the park was established around it.

Today Herttoniemi park is an artistically unique milieu. The combination of baroque and English garden is one of the greatest in Finland. The main building functions as a manor museum and the park is open to the public. There is also an old old farm brought from Sipoo which is an outdoor museum.

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Details

Founded: 19th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

arschka (12 months ago)
I went once in 1970 with Mutt and Grandma’s sister. Familiar yard also from the Wanderer's Waltz, which I watched the same year. An important place in the history of Helsinki t. Its hosts have been landmarks.
Pertti Rudolf Lindholm (12 months ago)
I rejoice in this place. With this you always get Michelin class food. Pleasant place in the old setting of a manor house. You have to visit here once a month to eat and enjoy good food and service. Near Tammisalo. N.7km from the center of Helsinki. You are in the peace of the countryside. Then take a walk to the manor park which is 40m away and enjoy life. You can get the car pounded 30m away. No parking fees.
Juha Paappa (14 months ago)
Great historical place. Well maintained park. Worth to see.
Gerd-Peter Löcke (3 years ago)
Zusammenhängende Parklandschaft. Gute Gastwirtschaft auf dem Gelände. Haupthaus leider nur selten geöffnet.
Neropatti (3 years ago)
Kaunis ja mielenkiintoinen kartanomiljöö ja ällistyttävän asiantunteva opas joka teki historian näkyväksi meille. Tosiaankaan ei mikään ulkoa opeteltu tylsä puhe vaan elävä kertomus kartanon vaiheista jota kaskuin vielä kevennettiin. Harvinaista herkkua, koska aukioloajat ovat melko suppeat. Ympäröivä puisto ja rannat ovat erinomaista ulkoilumaastoa.
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