Tamminiemi villa was one of the official residences of the President of Finland from 1940 until 1981. From that date, until his death, it served as the residence of President Urho Kekkonen. Designed by architects Sigurd Frosterus and Gustaf Strengell, the jugendstil villa was built in 1903 for the Danish-born businessman Jörgen Nissen. The villa was later owned or rented by a number of individuals, before being acquired by the publisher and artistic patron Amos Anderson in 1924. Anderson donated Tamminiemi to the Finnish State in 1940, to serve as a presidential residence.

Although Presidents Ryti and Mannerheim resided at Tamminiemi, the villa is particularly associated with President Kekkonen - due in large part to the fact that it was his home for around thirty years. President Paasikivi preferred to use the Presidential Palace as his official residence during his presidency. Tamminiemi also has a famous sauna which president Kekkonen used to entertain his guests.

Today Tamminiemi is the Urho Kekkonen Museum. It’s closed due to renovation and will open in 2012.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.nba.fi
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pekka Kosonen (2 years ago)
Great piece of Finland history.
Robin Bobin (2 years ago)
Interesting and a little bit unusual.
Jukka Laaksonen (2 years ago)
Well worth visit for anyone interested in history of Finland from fifties to seventies - the time when the presidents were Kekkonens. The sauna was a centerpiece of politics at the time and is stilm impressive.
Mike Going (2 years ago)
A pleasant museum detailing lots of Kekkonen history. Not much in english. Best for those interested in Finnish political history. Cafe is nice but a bit expensive for what it is and the level of service.
Janne (3 years ago)
Nice historial place. Here have been visiting famous people. Full of history. I recommend.
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