St. Boniface's Abbey

Munich, Germany

St. Boniface's Abbey is a Benedictine monastery founded in 1835 by King Ludwig I of Bavaria, as a part of his efforts to reanimate the country's spiritual life by the restoration of the monasteries destroyed during the secularisation of the early 19th century. The abbey, constructed in Byzantine style, was formally dedicated in 1850. It was destroyed in World War II and only partly restored. The church contains the tombs of King Ludwig I and of his queen, Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen.

St. Boniface's is situated in a city, which is unusual for a Benedictine monastery. To ensure the material provision of the monks, King Ludwig bought the former Andechs Abbey, which had been secularised in 1803, along with its supporting farmlands and gave it to the new abbey. For this reason Andechs is now a priory of St. Boniface's Abbey.

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Details

Founded: 1835
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Grace Egbele (2 months ago)
It is my church where I worship every Sunday and members of the congregation are very nice and welcoming
emmanuel ebhojieaye (14 months ago)
Multi national center.
ehimen ehijie (3 years ago)
It was awesome in GOD'S presence..
Tammey Nowacki (3 years ago)
Very nice English Mass.
Ilaria Carrara Cagni (3 years ago)
The children mass on Sundays at 10.30 is a wonderful hour of peace and family happiness.
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