The Amalienburg is an elaborate hunting lodge in the grounds of Nymphenburg Palace. It was constructed in 1734-1739 by François de Cuvilliés, in Rococo style, for the later Holy Roman Emperor Charles VII and his wife, Maria Amalia of Austria.

Most of the ground floor is given over to the round Hall of Mirrors in the center of the building which mirrored walls reflect the external nature. It was designed by Johann Baptist Zimmermann and Joachim Dietrich (1690–1753). It creates an ethereal atmosphere in the Bavarian national colors of silver and blue.

In the south of the hall, the door leads to the electoral Rest room and the Blue Cabinet, with access to the privy chamber. The Blue Cabinet was the bedroom of the Electress and the pavilion also accommodates a kennel room for the hunting dogs.

North from the Hall of Mirrors is the entrance to the Pheasant room and the Hunting room. The Pheasant Room is bordering the kitchen. The kitchen is decorated with precious tiles from Delft which when being laid were mixed up by workers in the wrong order. The blue and white tiles in a Chinese style show flowers and birds. The Castrol stove (1735) built for the kitchen is a masonry construction with several fireholes covered by perforated iron plates. It is also known as a stew stove and was the first design that completely enclosed the fire.

In the central niche of the eastern facade, is a stucco sculpture by Johann Baptist Zimmermann, representing a scene with the hunting goddess Diana. The presentation introduces the image program in all facilities of the building. The attic was derived from 1737, also manufactured to a design by Zimmermann, with decorative vases, which disappeared at an unknown date. In 1992, they were recreated and designed by Hans Geiger, four adorn the entrance facade, twelve the garden side of the Amalienburg.

A platform with ornate lattice, which is fitted to the building in the center of the roof, served as a raised hide for pheasant hunting: The birds were driven to the Amalienburg from the former pheasant (now menagerie) building. Since the castle could be supplied by the kitchen of Nymphenburg Palace, the Amalienburg lacks private farm buildings in contrast to the two other park pavilions.

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Munich, Germany
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Details

Founded: 1734-1739
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

chans chachacan (3 years ago)
You buy the tickets in nymphenburg schloss, and by buying the amalienburg you can enter to so many places for just 4 or 5 euros.
Yves Haufe (3 years ago)
Must see during your tour in the garden of the castle Nymphenburg. It's the small castle of the elector Amalia with several different furnished rooms. I was especially impressed by the mirror room and the authentic kitchen, again with the Asian wall artistry.
BradJill Travels (3 years ago)
s well worth visiting during your time at Nymphenburg. This is a leisure building and hunting lodge built for Elector Karl Albrecht's wife in 1734. The palace is the works of François de Cuvilliés and is considered a Rococo Masterpiece. Opening hours are 9am to 6pm daily (April to Mid-October). It is closed from Mid-October to March. The palace exterior is attractive but it is the intricately designed interior that you really need to see. We very much enjoyed viewing the saloon rooms here. The large saloon was designed as a Hall of Mirrors and is delightful. Luckily, during our visit, we were the only two in the palace, allowing for unobstructed views and photo taking. Other rooms feature nice paintings and more heavily decorated fringes and Rococo style ornamentation. The kitchen is designed in Chinese manner, making heavy use of Delft blue and white tiles. Overall, we were quite taken with Amalienburg. This was the most impressive of the four palaces you can visit within the park grounds at Nymphenburg and would be the first place we would return to the next time we visit. Note: Entrance to Amalienburg requires a Park Palace ticket (€4.50 per person) which includes Badenburg, Pagodenburg and Magdalenenklause. Alternatively you can purchase the full combo ticket (€11.50 per person), providing access to the four palaces as well as the Nymphenburg Castle, Marstall (Stagecoach) and Porzellen (Porcelain) museums as well.
Khánh Dương (4 years ago)
Just a quick visit and a small building. But it's really impress me because it's located on beautiful ground.
Juele S (5 years ago)
Very beautiful pavilion, it's a quick visit.
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