The Amalienburg is an elaborate hunting lodge in the grounds of Nymphenburg Palace. It was constructed in 1734-1739 by François de Cuvilliés, in Rococo style, for the later Holy Roman Emperor Charles VII and his wife, Maria Amalia of Austria.

Most of the ground floor is given over to the round Hall of Mirrors in the center of the building which mirrored walls reflect the external nature. It was designed by Johann Baptist Zimmermann and Joachim Dietrich (1690–1753). It creates an ethereal atmosphere in the Bavarian national colors of silver and blue.

In the south of the hall, the door leads to the electoral Rest room and the Blue Cabinet, with access to the privy chamber. The Blue Cabinet was the bedroom of the Electress and the pavilion also accommodates a kennel room for the hunting dogs.

North from the Hall of Mirrors is the entrance to the Pheasant room and the Hunting room. The Pheasant Room is bordering the kitchen. The kitchen is decorated with precious tiles from Delft which when being laid were mixed up by workers in the wrong order. The blue and white tiles in a Chinese style show flowers and birds. The Castrol stove (1735) built for the kitchen is a masonry construction with several fireholes covered by perforated iron plates. It is also known as a stew stove and was the first design that completely enclosed the fire.

In the central niche of the eastern facade, is a stucco sculpture by Johann Baptist Zimmermann, representing a scene with the hunting goddess Diana. The presentation introduces the image program in all facilities of the building. The attic was derived from 1737, also manufactured to a design by Zimmermann, with decorative vases, which disappeared at an unknown date. In 1992, they were recreated and designed by Hans Geiger, four adorn the entrance facade, twelve the garden side of the Amalienburg.

A platform with ornate lattice, which is fitted to the building in the center of the roof, served as a raised hide for pheasant hunting: The birds were driven to the Amalienburg from the former pheasant (now menagerie) building. Since the castle could be supplied by the kitchen of Nymphenburg Palace, the Amalienburg lacks private farm buildings in contrast to the two other park pavilions.

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Munich, Germany
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Details

Founded: 1734-1739
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christine Higgins (5 months ago)
If you want to see rococo this is the place. There is no furniture here but the walls are covered with three dimensional art. There is a Cupid holding a fishing net hanging down over a doorway. There are women ready to step down from their perch along the top of the walls. I can’t imagine the time required to make all of these details and fit them together. It’s small so you will get through it in 10 minutes if you just walk through. Take a little more time and you will be amazed at the details in each room. There is a small kitchen that is decorated in the Chinese style of the time.
Nanda kumar (7 months ago)
Just beautiful, the green space and water bodies around it makes it really special.
Sreejit Dutta (3 years ago)
It’s a cute little place which is both beautiful inside and outside. It has an elegant feel about it.
chans chachacan (4 years ago)
You buy the tickets in nymphenburg schloss, and by buying the amalienburg you can enter to so many places for just 4 or 5 euros.
Yves Haufe (4 years ago)
Must see during your tour in the garden of the castle Nymphenburg. It's the small castle of the elector Amalia with several different furnished rooms. I was especially impressed by the mirror room and the authentic kitchen, again with the Asian wall artistry.
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