Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls

Lyon, France

The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls was part of the federal sanctuary of the three Gauls dedicated to the cult of Rome and Augustus celebrated by the 60 Gallic tribes when they gathered at Lugdunum (Lyon). The amphitheatre was built at the foot of the La Croix-Rousse hill at what was then the confluence of the Rhône and Saône.

Excavations have revealed a basement of three elliptical walls linked by cross-walls and a channel surrounding the oval central arena. The arena was slightly sloped, with the building's south part supported by a now-vanished vault. The arena's dimensions are 67,6m by 42m. This phase of the amphitheatre housed games which accompanied the imperial cult, with its low capacity (1,800 seats) being enough for delegations from the 60 Gallic tribes.

The amphitheatre was expanded at the start of the 2nd century. Two galleries were added around the old amphitheatre, raising its width from 25 metres to 105 metres and its capacity to about 20,000 seats. In so doing it made it a building open to the whole population of Lugdunum and its environs.

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Details

Founded: 0-100 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

sri fatmawati (2 months ago)
This place remind to Rome, Italy
Denis Pyatkov (3 months ago)
Wasn’t open but still very cool to see from the top and side
Naeomi Pluim (4 months ago)
A beautiful location to see some old historical sites. Due to Covid it is currently closed to the public, but you can still walk around the fences and see everything. I would highly recommend visiting this sight!
Michael Barakat (5 months ago)
A round theatre that projects on a red plaza, I guess where the gladiators used to battle giving a spectacle. However, I felt that it’s not well conserved and it was closed.
Clary Bane (5 months ago)
It's okay. You can't get inside of the ruins, which is what we were expecting after seeing the bigger ones in Lyon. It's way smaller than the other ones, but I still recommend to go by there and check it out.
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