Chapelle de la Trinité

Lyon, France

The Chapelle de la Trinité is the first church in baroque style built in Lyon. It was created by the architect Étienne Martellange, a Jesuit brother who introduced architectural models of the Counter-Reformation in Lyon. Built between 1617 and 1622, the chapel is located within the building of the Grand Collège, under the direction of the Jesuits since 1567. It was devoted to college students. It was consecrated in 1622. The decor is very refined with coatings of Carrara marble.

Until September 1799, the chapel served as a barracks. In 1801, the First Consul was there proclaimed President of the Italian Republic. Thomas Blanchet, Horace le Blanc, Magnan and Pierre David are the sculptors or painters whose works can be seen in the chapel. There are often patrimonial visits, haute couture shows, seminars and charity work in the chapel. About 30,000 people visit it each year.

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Address

Rue de la Bourse 29, Lyon, France
See all sites in Lyon

Details

Founded: 1617-1622
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pascal Savignon (20 months ago)
Very nice place but acoustics a little too loud
Josiane Desseignet (2 years ago)
A magical place and an extraordinary concert, superb performance
Josiane Desseignet (2 years ago)
A magical place and an extraordinary concert, superb performance
al ex (2 years ago)
Magnificent quartet in this place always magical and magnified by candle lighting I wish it had lasted longer!
al ex (2 years ago)
Magnificent quartet in this place always magical and magnified by candle lighting I wish it had lasted longer!
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