St. Mark's Church

Salzburg, Austria

St. Mark's Church (Markuskirche) near the Klaus Gate at the foot of the Mönchsberg is a masterpiece of baroque architecture: the cornerstone for the Ursuline Convent church was laid in 1699. A smaller church located on the same site was destroyed by a disastrous rockfall from the Mönchsberg thirty years before. At the time of its construction, raising a building on the small strip of land between the Mönchsberg and the precipitous banks of the Salzach was a masterly performance.

Archbishop Johann Ernst von Thun called on the renowned architect, Fischer von Erlach, who was also commissioned to design other churches in Salzburg. The church was consecrated in 1705 but the construction of the convent took another two decades. It served as the seat for the Ursuline Order until 1957. Today the former St. Ursuline Church, consecrated to St. Mark the Evangelist, is known by its original name again.

Three saints adorn the church's pediment: St. Mark the Evangelist in the center with St. Augustine and St. Ursula on either side. Visitors are usually stunned by the unexpected richness of the church's interior: elaborate stucco, colorful frescoes by the Tyrolean painter, Christoph Anton Mayr, and the cupola with portrayals of St. Ursula in heaven. The saints on the façade can also be found inside the church. The altar furniture and pews are embellished with fine woodcarving.

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Details

Founded: 1699
Category: Religious sites in Austria

More Information

www.salzburg.info

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christian Winkler (6 months ago)
Tolle Sehenswürdigkeit
Olena Pidhoreckyj (10 months ago)
Beautiful church! Has a relic on the left side is it st. Ursula?
Sonaira D ́Ávila (11 months ago)
Igreja de São Marcos, fica perto do Portão de Klaus ao pé do Mönchsberg de arquitetura barroca do ano 1700 . Uma boa caminhada com vista para o rio.
OnZe (12 months ago)
nice old church with a weird looking statue in front of it
Jeffrey Ortiz (3 years ago)
Opening hours: Daily 9.00 a.m. until 6.00 p.m.
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