Augarten Flak Towers

Vienna, Austria

Flak towers (Flaktürme) were eight complexes of large, above-ground, anti-aircraft gun blockhouse towers constructed by Nazi Germany in the cities of Berlin, Hamburg, and Vienna from 1940 onwards. The towers were used by the Luftwaffe to defend against Allied air raids against these cities during World War II. They also served as air-raid shelters for tens of thousands of local civilians.

In Vienna military authorities chose the Augarten as one of several places to erect massive buildings for anti-aircraft defence to protect the inner city from Allied bombing. During summer 1944 the construction of a 55 metre high tower with platforms for anti-aircraft guns and nearby also a 51 metre high control tower was begun but not finished. Their remains are still visible in the middle of the park. Moreover during the war hundreds of cubic metres of rubbish were dumped on the site whilst armoured vehicles criss-crossed the garden and - as it is supposed - common graves were dug for hundreds of war victims.

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    Founded: 1944
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    en.wikipedia.org

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    User Reviews

    Tiago Leitao (4 months ago)
    The most advanced tape of german WW2 flak towers (bauart 3) still with minimal modifications. Most impressive!
    Arca P (9 months ago)
    Old antiaircraft Tower in Wienna
    Nikola Dokic (9 months ago)
    This monument is proof of power of Nazi German how prepared they were to defend their empire just in case, this tower was a battle station just in case of air invasion, they were able to fire 14km range and those guns were huge,,today it is just a memory and you can't go upstairs :(
    RENZ (9 months ago)
    Had to fend off a couple of those MG42 wielding baddies, but other than that I had a great time.
    Данила Успехов (12 months ago)
    good place for walking
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