Riddarholmen Church

Stockholm, Sweden

The Riddarholmen Church (Riddarholmskyrkan) is the burial church of the Swedish monarchs. The congregation was dissolved in 1807 and today the church is used only for burial and commemorative purposes. Swedish monarchs from Gustavus Adolphus (d. 1632 AD) to Gustaf V (d. 1950) are entombed here (with exceptions such as Queen Christina who is buried within St. Peter's Basilica in Rome), as well as the earlier monarchs Magnus III (d. 1290) and Charles VIII (d. 1470).

Riddarholmen church is one of the oldest buildings in Stockholm, parts of it dating to the late 13th century, when it was built as a greyfriars monastery. After the Protestant Reformation, the monastery was closed and the building transformed into a Protestant church. A spire designed by Willem Boy was added during the reign of John III, but it was destroyed by a strike of lightning on July 28, 1835 after which it was replaced with the present cast iron spire.

Coats of arms of knights of the Order of the Seraphim are in the walls of the church. When a knight of the Order dies, his coat of arms is hung in the church and when the funeral takes place the church bells are rung constantly from 12:00 to 13:00.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1270-1300
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Henry Baxter (17 days ago)
Very scenic square. Lovely at dusk in the winter time.
Mugen S. (26 days ago)
Very beautiful. But! The streets impact the view negatively and so does the nearby construction works. The best point of view is across two roads. from there you can see the two peaks align perfectly. very aesthetically pleasing. However, unfortunately it IS indeed across two roads... Mind the lot of tourists obviously. (And yes, I am a tourist myself, ironically)
Felipe Lima (32 days ago)
The Riddarholm Church is the burial church of the Swedish monarchs. It is located on the island of Riddarholmen, close to the Royal Palace in Stockholm, Sweden. The congregation was dissolved in 1807 and today the church is used only for burial and commemorative purposes.
Sean Fowler (3 months ago)
Super interesting if you have even a little bit of interest in Swedish history, or architecture. With parts of the structure dating back to the 1200s, just being near something that old was fascinating. Minus a star for the lack of guides; though the printed material was informative enough about the personages in the various chapels and crypts, I would have appreciated a spoken descriptive tour much more. Other reviews indicate they exist, but there were none today.
Erin Portman (4 months ago)
We stumbled upon this church while walking around. We only knew we wanted to go in not knowing we were stumbling into a mausoleum for royals. I'm still in awe by the building and history we experienced. From the architecture to the coat of arms, expect to be amazed. It was the best $5 we have spent so far.
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