The Hallwyl Palace was built 1893-1898 to the design of Isak Gustaf Clason for Count Walther von Hallwyl and his wife Wilhelmina. It was created to accommodate the office of the count and the extensive art collection of the countess. While the exterior of the building and the court is historical in style — borrowing architectonic elements from medieval prototypes and Renaissance Venice — it was technically utterly modern on its completion — including electricity, central heating, telephones, and bathrooms, while the elevator was a later addition.

The countess collected her artworks during her worldwide journeys in order to found a museum, and, consequently, the palace was donated to the Swedish State in 1920, a decade before her death. The collection encompasses some 50,000 objects, and the museum is still open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1893-1898
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cass André (2 years ago)
Small but nice. Avoid the week end you may be wait a longtime in front of the door !
Diana Iov (2 years ago)
We had the free visit, which gives you the main idea about the house, but you can also get an extended visit with a guide if you are interested in seeing (and learning) more. The staff was very friendly and helpful. We spent about an hour here and we enjoyed every minute. Loved this place, the rooms were beautifully decorated and overall very impressive. Definitely recommend!
Noukka Signe (2 years ago)
Very, very impressive museum. The fact that everything is kept so pristine is just amazing. It's beautiful and I'm thinking about going back for the guided tour to just learn more about it.
Alexej Gossen (2 years ago)
It's impressive to see what this lady was able to put into get Place and being way ahead of her time! I definitely would recommend to have a guided tour to see the Chinese porcelain room
Edelweis F.e. (2 years ago)
An extremely well-kept palace. Free entrance=free visit. You can have an extended guided tour for a small fee-very friendly guides in epoch costumes. Besides, there's a lovely patio café, very relaxing. It's really worth the visit while in Stockholm!!!
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