The Hallwyl Palace was built 1893-1898 to the design of Isak Gustaf Clason for Count Walther von Hallwyl and his wife Wilhelmina. It was created to accommodate the office of the count and the extensive art collection of the countess. While the exterior of the building and the court is historical in style — borrowing architectonic elements from medieval prototypes and Renaissance Venice — it was technically utterly modern on its completion — including electricity, central heating, telephones, and bathrooms, while the elevator was a later addition.

The countess collected her artworks during her worldwide journeys in order to found a museum, and, consequently, the palace was donated to the Swedish State in 1920, a decade before her death. The collection encompasses some 50,000 objects, and the museum is still open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1893-1898
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Collins Santhanasamy (7 months ago)
A cool place to see when in Stockholm - the home of Wilhelmina and Walther (Architect also designed the national museum's building) which was given to the state and is now a museum. It hosts several lavish rooms and a picture gallery. Due to covid we had to wait for a short while before entering but it was not very long. Free entry and friendly staff.
Riccardo Rossi (8 months ago)
Free access to permanent exhibition. Interiors of supreme taste, large private collections ceramic pottery, silverware, decorative weapons etc.
Alexandra Khalaim (8 months ago)
Worth visiting for those who like the atmosphere of 19 century luxury houses. Interesting facts are described in the information brochures for every room
Marcin Lesniak (12 months ago)
Very interesting place to visit in Stokholm. Excellent idea. We loved it.
Marjorie Cohn (12 months ago)
Beautiful museum, can be visited in one hour or so. Free entrance and, at the moment, booking is needed. Even without joining a guided tour, it is possible to get a lot of information with the little guide available upstairs - you'll find them on a pile to the right of the dining room.
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