The Hallwyl Palace was built 1893-1898 to the design of Isak Gustaf Clason for Count Walther von Hallwyl and his wife Wilhelmina. It was created to accommodate the office of the count and the extensive art collection of the countess. While the exterior of the building and the court is historical in style — borrowing architectonic elements from medieval prototypes and Renaissance Venice — it was technically utterly modern on its completion — including electricity, central heating, telephones, and bathrooms, while the elevator was a later addition.

The countess collected her artworks during her worldwide journeys in order to found a museum, and, consequently, the palace was donated to the Swedish State in 1920, a decade before her death. The collection encompasses some 50,000 objects, and the museum is still open to the public.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1893-1898
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cass André (2 years ago)
Small but nice. Avoid the week end you may be wait a longtime in front of the door !
Diana Iov (2 years ago)
We had the free visit, which gives you the main idea about the house, but you can also get an extended visit with a guide if you are interested in seeing (and learning) more. The staff was very friendly and helpful. We spent about an hour here and we enjoyed every minute. Loved this place, the rooms were beautifully decorated and overall very impressive. Definitely recommend!
Noukka Signe (2 years ago)
Very, very impressive museum. The fact that everything is kept so pristine is just amazing. It's beautiful and I'm thinking about going back for the guided tour to just learn more about it.
Alexej Gossen (2 years ago)
It's impressive to see what this lady was able to put into get Place and being way ahead of her time! I definitely would recommend to have a guided tour to see the Chinese porcelain room
Edelweis F.e. (2 years ago)
An extremely well-kept palace. Free entrance=free visit. You can have an extended guided tour for a small fee-very friendly guides in epoch costumes. Besides, there's a lovely patio café, very relaxing. It's really worth the visit while in Stockholm!!!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kalozha Church

The Kalozha church of Saints Boris and Gleb is the oldest extant structure in Hrodna. It is the only surviving monument of ancient Black Ruthenian architecture, distinguished from other Orthodox churches by prolific use of polychrome faceted stones of blue, green or red tint which could be arranged to form crosses or other figures on the wall.

The church is a cross-domed building supported by six circular pillars. The outside is articulated with projecting pilasters, which have rounded corners, as does the building itself. The ante-nave contains the choir loft, accessed by a narrow gradatory in the western wall. Two other stairs were discovered in the walls of the side apses; their purpose is not clear. The floor is lined with ceramic tiles forming decorative patterns. The interior was lined with innumerable built-in pitchers, which usually serve in Eastern Orthodox churches as resonators but in this case were scored to produce decorative effects. For this reason, the central nave has never been painted.

The church was built before 1183 and survived intact, depicted in the 1840s by Michał Kulesza, until 1853, when the south wall collapsed, due to its perilous location on the high bank of the Neman. During restoration works, some fragments of 12th-century frescoes were discovered in the apses. Remains of four other churches in the same style, decorated with pitchers and coloured stones instead of frescoes, were discovered in Hrodna and Vaŭkavysk. They all date back to the turn of the 13th century, as do remains of the first stone palace in the Old Hrodna Castle.

In 2004, the church was included in the Tentative List of UNESCO"s World Heritage Sites.