Maultasch Castle

Terlano, Italy

The ruins of Castel Neuhaus, also known as Maultasch Castle, are located above Terlano (Terlan). Castel Neuhaus is almost imperceptible from the bottom of the Adige valley, only its donjon rises into the sky. The castle was first mentioned in 1228, and was probably constructed as border fortress for the Counts of Tyrol as shelter from the Counts of Bolzano. In the second half of the 13th century slightly below the castle a custom station was built. However, soon the buildings started dwindling in importance, as Bolzano was occupied by Meinhard, Duke of Carinthia, without cease.

It is presumed that Margaret, nicknamed Margarete Maultasch, loved to spend some time at this castle when she was Countess of Tyrol, but unfortunately this is undocumented. For this reason, in common parlance this ruin is also referred to as “Maultasch Castle”.

In the period of time between 1382 and 1559 the Lords of Niedertor of Bolzano resided in the castle, while the Lords of Wolkenstein, owners of Castel Trostburg, did so until 1733. The Counts of Enzenberg, however, had the castle consolidated and in parts renovated. Today Castel Neuhaus is a popular excursion destination, as it is easily reachable also for families with children on the Margarete Trail in Terlano.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Terlano, Italy
See all sites in Terlano

Details

Founded: 1228
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.suedtirolerland.it

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

JulianH (2 years ago)
Die Burgruine Maultasch (Neuhaus) ist aufjedenfall einen Besuch wert. Der Weg zur Burgruine ist zwar ein bisschen holprig, aber mit Bergschuhen ist leicht begehbar. Bie Burgruine ist rund um die Uhr geöffnet und man hat von oben einen super Blick über Terlan und das ganze Etschtal.
Christian Auer (2 years ago)
Die Ruine oberhalb terlan ist zu Fuß in ca 20 Minuten vom Dorf aus zu erreichen. das Schloss kann besichtigt werden und wurde hervorragend restauriert. an schönen Tagen lohnt die Aussicht über das als etschtal. einmal im Jahr wird auf der Ruine eine Veranstaltung durchgeführt bei der mittelalterliche Bräuche gezeigt werden
Jürgen (2 years ago)
Es lohnt sich immer mal ein Blick über Terlan zu richten. Die Aussicht war herrlich das Wetter an jenem Tag: klare Sicht mit Sonneneinstrahlung Die Wanderung: Aufstieg zur Burg. Relax Wer in der Region Terlan, Bozen ist sollte sich die Zeit nehmen die Burgruine zu besuchen
Reinhard Windisch (2 years ago)
Kleine Burgruine bietet eine schöne Aussicht. Gut zu erreichen!
Marco Santoni (3 years ago)
Ok
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wroclaw Town Hall

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

Further innovations during the 16th century included the addition of the city’s Coat of arms (1536), and the rebuilding of the upper part of the tower (1558–59). This was the final stage of the main building program. By 1560, the major features of today’s Stray Rates were established.

The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.