Waldemarsudde Palace

Stockholm, Sweden

Prins Eugens Waldemarsudde is a museum located on Djurgården in central Stockholm. It was the former home of the Swedish Prince Eugen, who discovered the place in 1892, when he rented a house there for a few days. Seven years later he bought the premises and had a new house designed by the architect Ferdinand Boberg, who also designed Rosenbad (the Prime Minister's Office and the Government Chancellery), and erected 1903–1904.

Prince Eugen had been educated as a painter in Paris and after his death the house was converted to a museum of his own and others paintings. The prince died in 1947 and is buried by the beach close to the house.

The complex consists of a castle-like main building completed in 1905, and the Gallery Building, added in 1913. The estate also includes the original manor-house building, known as the Old House and an old linseed mill, both dating back to the 1780s. The estate is set in parkland which features centuries-old oak trees and reflects the prince's interest for gardening and flower arrangement. The Art Nouveau interior, including the tiled stoves, by Boberg are designed in a Gustavian style and makes good use of both the panoramic view of the inlet to Stockholm and the light resulting from the elevated location of the building.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrea Moro (11 months ago)
Very nice walk in this front "seashore" park. Ideally for charging back the batteries. I guess that during the summer is much better.
Michael Tamvakis (2 years ago)
A delightful house/museum with lots of paintings and a nice café nearby. A bit difficult to get to, unless you time the tour boat well or be prepared to walk a bit. Well worth a visit though.
Michael Barnes (2 years ago)
A great museum with not only beautiful art, but a beautiful ambiance within an old mansion surrounded by beautiful grounds. The house itself is fascinating with great information on the owner and his collections, followed by a great collection of Nordic art spanning lots of artists and genres. It's a great place to spend 1-2 hours if in the area and offers a unique and different experience from the major museums on the island.
Blandine Lamaison (2 years ago)
Love Swedish art. Some exhibitions are better than others. Nordic painting was a bit disappointing. I was expecting to see some Norwegian art too. But the place is fab
Cecilia Nakeva von Mentzer (2 years ago)
Lovely place with strong historical foundation. I have visited the exhibition of Sigrid Hjertén twice and we have eaten in the Prince restaurant and seen his home - beautiful paintings and flowers. The Prince Eugene oak sadly is struck by disease this year which makes you wonder about how environmentally well the wood is. Highly recommended to visit!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.