Waldemarsudde Palace

Stockholm, Sweden

Prins Eugens Waldemarsudde is a museum located on Djurgården in central Stockholm. It was the former home of the Swedish Prince Eugen, who discovered the place in 1892, when he rented a house there for a few days. Seven years later he bought the premises and had a new house designed by the architect Ferdinand Boberg, who also designed Rosenbad (the Prime Minister's Office and the Government Chancellery), and erected 1903–1904.

Prince Eugen had been educated as a painter in Paris and after his death the house was converted to a museum of his own and others paintings. The prince died in 1947 and is buried by the beach close to the house.

The complex consists of a castle-like main building completed in 1905, and the Gallery Building, added in 1913. The estate also includes the original manor-house building, known as the Old House and an old linseed mill, both dating back to the 1780s. The estate is set in parkland which features centuries-old oak trees and reflects the prince's interest for gardening and flower arrangement. The Art Nouveau interior, including the tiled stoves, by Boberg are designed in a Gustavian style and makes good use of both the panoramic view of the inlet to Stockholm and the light resulting from the elevated location of the building.

References:

Comments

Your name



Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Osa Lundberg (5 months ago)
Refreshing and joyful. Good for inspiration and regeneration. Impressionism that is soulful, penetrative and restorative.
Joseph Sharps (6 months ago)
Cool air conditioned on a very hot day. Wonderful to concentrate on Prinz Eugens excellent collection, including originals from Carl Larsson, I really recommend a visit. There are toilets on every floor and an excellent gift and card shop
Litta S (6 months ago)
Absolutely beautiful inside and outside. I visited long time ago, would like to visit again.
Martin Kubler (7 months ago)
It's lovely just to walk around in the garden, which is full of art. The perfect destination on a sunny Stockholm day.
Jonathan Murphy (2 years ago)
Beautiful (very) location. Of course the gallery depends on the particular exhibition. When I went it was slightly disappointing, rather conservative impressionism, but the location kind of makes up for any exhibition disappointment...
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.