Colonne di San Lorenzo

Milan, Italy

The Colonne di San Lorenzo or Columns of San Lorenzo is a group of ancient Roman ruins, located in front of the Basilica of San Lorenzo in central Milan.

The colonnade, consisting mainly of 16 tall Corinthian columns in a row, now fronts an open square. In the 4th century, the columns were moved here, after removal from a likely 2nd century pagan temple or public bath house structure. South of the columns, one of the medieval gates still has some Roman marble decoration in place. In the 16th century, in preparations for a celebratory entrance into Milan of the monarch King Phillip II of Spain, it was proposed to raze the colonnade to widen the route; Ferrante Gonzaga declined the suggestion.

Up until 1935, the space between the church and columns was entirely occupied by old houses abutting onto the façade of the church itself. Indeed, the church complex was fully surrounded by old houses. Despite the plans to conserve this ancient urban fabric, the renovations led to the demolition of the old houses and the isolation of the monument on the front side. Following bombing during World War II, the church complex became isolated also on the rear side, where the fenced Basilicas Park now stands, allowing popular views of the Basilica.

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Details

Founded: 300-400 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Merlin Ranee (6 months ago)
Easy walked through the busy street while window shopped along the way. Stumbled upon a churros stall perfect for a quick bite for some loose change. Nice spot for photos
Leonardo Barzi (6 months ago)
If you are in Milan to have fun with your friends, for a stag/hen do and you like drinking on the cheap (not in chic bars where you can sit on nice chairs, around a nice table, ...), then that's the place for you. At the Squallido bar (inside the arch), you can have Gin Tonics for €4 each and beers from €2.50: that's amazing, especially in the centre of Milan (15m walking from Duomo). Always recommended except in Winter (the weather is too cold for having a drink outside, except if you're Canadian, Russian or Scandinavian :P)
Alexandra Coscovelnita (6 months ago)
Be sure to visit this place at night. You are allowed to drink in the street here. It is usually crowded, especially on summer nights. You can grab a beer from the vendors and enjoy it with your friends.
Dheeraj Divakaran (6 months ago)
The place is quite good in the mornings, but in the evenings become slightly shady. The area has some good bars, but look out for people offering you for things you would not want. A good place to hang out with friends with good connectivity through out the night by trams.
Rick Lemoine (9 months ago)
While visiting Milan l I had a list of sites I wanted to see. This was the last one on my list. I thought I wasn't going to have enough time because I had any early flight. Fortunately, I was able to have more time and get a chance to see it. There were some great areas to shark very nearby as well. Also, there were a few nice restaurants one might have a nice dinner in.
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