Gothenburg Maritime Museum

Gothenburg, Sweden

The exhibitions at the Maritime Museum tell 400 years of maritime history. Themes include pirates past and present, life at sea, the Swedish American Line and much more. There are four permanent exhibitions displaying the history of sea routes, flows of people and ideas, Gothenburg port and technical development of seafaring.

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Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

K Najib (4 months ago)
Very nice place. I really enjoyed
Martin Jackson (5 months ago)
Only got to see the vessels from the dock, but I can see it would be interesting for those who like ships
Marcus T (9 months ago)
The ships are cool and really interesting, but they're not maintained very well. All ships have started to rust and when I was younger I was afraid of going down in the submarine because I thought it would sink. The cafe doesn't feel like a fresh place and the muffin I bought while I was there felt old, like it had been sitting there for a while. You should go here and look at the ships because it's quite cheap but don't eat here, leave and come back if you are hungry.
sukriti gupta (9 months ago)
A place you should definitely go to if you like boats or ships. They even have a war submarine that you can go inside. The ships are in great condition and offer a unique opportunity to experience what it must be like to live and be on the sea during a war.
Bob Mertens (9 months ago)
Only for very interested people. You have to invest a lot of time (around 2 hours) to visit every ship. If you are interested in old ships, this is the place to be! Submarine and a big destroyer are just waiting to be completely visited.
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