Oscar Fredrik Church

Gothenburg, Sweden

Oscar Fredrik Church was drawn by Helgo Zetterwall and completed in 1893. It represents the neo-Gothic style, but the influence is not the Nordic gothic style but rather the style one can find in the large cathedrals down in continental Europe. The church and the parish got its name from king Oscar II (Oscar Fredrik being his full name).

The church has been refurbished three times: 1915, 1940 and 1974. The 1940 refurbishment took away the side galleries and the decorations on the arches and capitals were painted over. During the latest renovation in 1978 the pulpit was moved back to its original position (south side of the choir) and older wall paintings and decorations were brought back to light.

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Details

Founded: 1893
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ely Matos (2 years ago)
Very beautiful church, great organ
saffa Dafalla (2 years ago)
Super nice and flexible with parking, they got an understanding with what it means when it crowded and people can’t find parking
Kelsey Reviews (2 years ago)
How is this place not more popular??! In 30 countries this is one of the most beautiful churches I’ve ever seen!
Elise M (2 years ago)
I didn’t go inside the church but the architecture from the outside is stunning! Definitely a must see if you’re in the area.
Emil Gustafsson (2 years ago)
We went there only to look at the building, and boy is it a beautiful one. I can't speak for the interior of the church, but I definitely recommend going if you just want to see a majestic building.
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