Oscar Fredrik Church

Gothenburg, Sweden

Oscar Fredrik Church was drawn by Helgo Zetterwall and completed in 1893. It represents the neo-Gothic style, but the influence is not the Nordic gothic style but rather the style one can find in the large cathedrals down in continental Europe. The church and the parish got its name from king Oscar II (Oscar Fredrik being his full name).

The church has been refurbished three times: 1915, 1940 and 1974. The 1940 refurbishment took away the side galleries and the decorations on the arches and capitals were painted over. During the latest renovation in 1978 the pulpit was moved back to its original position (south side of the choir) and older wall paintings and decorations were brought back to light.

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Details

Founded: 1893
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erhan Bektas (24 days ago)
It is an eye-catching church both from inside and from outside. It reflects history to a great extend. If you are are a foreign visitor you may need to get information from somewhere suitable. The written information inside is provided in Swedish so it would be helpful to use translators of some kind.
Claudia Mikaelsen (8 months ago)
I loved the impressive building and it's gorgeous exterior. Unfortunately didn't get to see it inside. My goal for next time I'm in Gothenburg
Kristóf Gruber (GK) (9 months ago)
Beautiful neogothic church. Never seen anything similar.
Jheniffer Sodré (12 months ago)
Very beautiful from the outside! I haven't had the chance to visit inside yet.
Hariklia Panteli (13 months ago)
Nice cathedral as a building nothing special inside
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