Capuchin Monastery

Salzburg, Austria

The Kapuzinerkloster are located on a mountain facing the old town if Salzburg: the Kapuzinerberg mountain, named after the abbey. There are two scenic routes leading to it: via the Imbergstiege off Steingasse and the romantic St. Johannes Church; this little church that is often missed by visitors is on one of Salzburg′s most picturesque spots and was recorded for the first time in the early 14th century.

Prince Archbishop Wolf Dietrich von Raitenau built the Kapuziner Abbey and church to accommodate the monks of the Kapuziner order, when he called them into Salzburg in 1594. The buildings were erected on the site of the Trompeterschlössel ('trumpeter castle'). The northern wall of the Kapuziner Church is the only remain of this castle.

It was extended and decorated in Baroque style under Prince Archbishop Max Gandolf. 'Imberg' was the former name of the Kapuzinerberg.

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Details

Founded: 1594
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Josam Waterman (14 months ago)
Great view and fairly easy to walk up there.
Anthony Kaleta (17 months ago)
Beautiful spot to view Salzburg’s old town. We counted 251 steps so be prepared for a hike - but it’s well worth the effort.
Yumi Jo (18 months ago)
It’s really hidden place where has a great view.
Eleanor Louray (2 years ago)
The Kapuzinerkloster is high atop the Kapuzinerberg, its architecture is more modest. Sitting above the City of Salzburg. You can enjoy the overwhelming views across the rooftops of Salzburg. There are a lot of stairs to climb to the top. After you make it to the top, the view will take your breath away. That's how beautiful it is. This is a place to go when you are not in a rush. There is so much to see here. Hope you will enjoy this Amazing Monastery. I know we did!
Nathaniel Meierpolys (2 years ago)
This was a nice retreat from the people and bustle of the city. If you can power through the steps, there are benches at the top that afford great views and a cool spot to relax in the shade, or keep going up the trails for a nice walk in the woods.
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