Plaza de la Corredera

Córdoba, Spain

Plaza de la Corredera is the result of the works carried out between 1683 and 1687 by Chief Magistrate Francisco Ronquillo Briceño. These were motivated by the almost collapse of one of the wooden stalls that were back then installed for the bullfightings held in the square which made the audience panic.

This grand 17th-century square has an elaborate history as a site of public spectacles, including bullfights and Inquisition burnings. Nowadays it's ringed by balconied apartments and is home to an assortment of popular, though culinarily run-of-the-mill, cafes and restaurants. The Mercado de la Corredera is a busy morning food market selling all kinds of fresh produce.

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Details

Founded: 1683-1687
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Spain

More Information

www.artencordoba.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Catherine Perez (3 years ago)
Perfect for have a nice breakfast outside, in the middle of it actually
Fafne A (3 years ago)
The plaza is in Cordoba old town. There is a choice of cafes and restaurants. We had the local churros with chocolate sauce. The main entrance to the market is here which is worth a visit. At the end is a cheap cafe.
Brian Lee (3 years ago)
Nice place but not much to see here. Good for a quick stop for drinks
David McChang (3 years ago)
Impressive space, with a couple of cafés. What's cool is that it all residential so real people live here rather than it just being a monument.
Nigel Orrin (3 years ago)
Got dropped off here for a quick refreshment in the middle of a pedal bike tour. Impressive very large square apparently it used to be the bull ring or bull plaza back in the day! Great fish market in one of the buildings, probably best to visit this early morning! as it was a bit smelly in the heat of the afternoon! The four of us had a glass of extremely good house wine and a bottle of water for less than 10 Euro.
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