San Pedro Church

Córdoba, Spain

San Pedro church is believed to be located over a previous edifice housing the remains of the Córdoban martyrs Januarius, Martial and Faustus, dating to the 4th century AD. After the conquest of the city by king Ferdinand III of Castile (1236), a church dedicated to St. Paul was built here in his program of construction to give a Christian appeal to the previously Muslim city. Construction began in the late 13th century and was completed in the early 14th century.

The edifice's current appearance date mostly to later restorations. Part of the bell tower and two of the medieval gates have survived, a new one having been added by architect Hernán Ruiz II in 1542. In 2006, the church was elevated to the status of minor basilica by Pope Benedict XVI.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alejandro D'Hers (3 years ago)
It's a beautiful Fernandina's church, which I highly recommend visiting.
Francisco Sánchez González Sánchez (3 years ago)
Parroquia neorrenacentista dedicada al abad Santiago Apóstol. Tiene varias capillas con una riqueza escultural acentuada. La cúpula central tiene algunos fresco de un valor cultural difícil de calcular. Cuenta con una obra pictórica exquisita de estilo renacentista todo un Oasis cultural siempre respetando que es un lugar de culto católico-cristiano.
Babak Bandpay (3 years ago)
Beautiful
Igor Krestnikov (3 years ago)
I would recommend a trip over Cordoba's churches provided with tickets to Mezquita.
Isabel X. Feng (10 years ago)
Behind the church there's a beautiful plaza full of trees and a fuente. You can see in side the church there's a beautiful yard, but it's locked and protected. It's a pity that turists can't get into it.
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