Hietaniemi Cemetery

Helsinki, Finland

The Hietaniemi cemetery is the location for Finnish state funeral services and most remarkable cemetery in Finland. The cemetery was placed to Hietaniemi in 1829. It was originally a military cemetery for the Finnish Guard, which was part of the Russian army.

The cemetery includes still a large military cemetery section for soldiers from the capital fallen in the wars against the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany: in the Winter War (1939–1940), the Continuation War (1941–1944) and the Lapland War (1944–1945). In the centre of the military cemetery are the tombs of the unknown soldier and Marshal C.G.E. Mannerheim. Other notable sections of the cemetery are the cemetery of the Finnish Guard, the Artist's Hill and the Statesman's Grove. For example six presidents of Finland are buried to Hietaniemi. In the Artist’s Hill rests many famous artists like Alvar Aalto, Akseli Gallen-Kallela and Mika Waltari.

The cemetery is a popular tourist attraction, especially amongst Finns visiting the graves of relatives fallen in wars or the graves of the many famous Finns buried there.

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Details

Founded: 1829
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

BJE May (14 months ago)
A surprisingly well done mix of tranquil park, and respectful cemetery.
Linda Turtola (17 months ago)
Tranquil cemetery that is well kept. The most famous Finns have their last resting spot here. Interesting if you are interested in gardening and history.
Slawek Kozakiewicz (2 years ago)
Peaceful green well kept cemetery. Few famous Finns buried there.
Bryan Williams (2 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful cemetery...serene and so much more like a garden. Stunning headstones! Must visit.
Simon O (2 years ago)
The cemetery might not be the most cheerful place, but this one had not a touch of hopelessness. Beautiful and calm place.
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