Abbot's Palace

Gdańsk, Poland

The Abbots' Palace (Pałac Opatów w Oliwie) is a roccoco style palace in Oliwa. The first portion of the palace, the 'Old Palace' was constructed in the 15th century. Later, in the first half of the sixteen hundreds a 'New Palace' was added, which served as the residency of the then abbot of the Cistercians, Jan Grabiński. The final additions to the palace were made between 1754 and 1756, and were funded by another Cistercian abbot, Jacek Rybiński.

After the partitions of Poland the area became part of Prussia, in 1831 real estate of the Cistercians was secularized and the palace became property of the House of Hohenzollern. From 1796 until 1836 the Bishops of Ermland (Warmia), Karl von Hohenzollern-Hechingen and Joseph von Hohenzollern-Hechingen resided in the Palace. It remained empty until 1869 when Maria Anna von Hohenzollern-Hechingen, niece of Joseph, took up residence there. After her death in 1888 the ownership of the palace was taken over by the city of Oliva, which used it for offices and apartments.

During the interwar period of the Free City of Danzig the palace contained a museum which housed exhibitions on the history of the region. The director in charge of the of the museum was a Nazi activist named Erich Keyser.

In 1945, at the end of World War II (during which time it served as an arms depot) it was set on fire by German troops who sought to clear the terrain in front of the advancing Red Army. The palace was rebuilt in 1965 through the efforts of the Pomeranian Museum in Gdańsk. It initially served as the ethnographic department of the museum. In 1972 the Museum was elevated to a status of a National Museum.

Since 1989 the palace contains the Department of Modern Art of the Polish National Museum in Gdańsk. In February 1990 a special gallery devoted to contemporary Polish art was established. Permanent exhibitions include works by Polish artists from 19th and 20th century (painting, sculpture and ceramics). It also houses the 'Promotional Gallery' which exhibits works by young artists.

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Address

Cystersów 18, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marek Krajewski (2 years ago)
Jedzenie bardzo dobre. Porcje niewielkie. Ceny z kosmosu.
Angel White (2 years ago)
Milo
Celestial Ode (2 years ago)
Amazing
Stan Ciesielski (3 years ago)
We had to wait for our order for about an hour. We booked the table for 8 the day before. Food was good although not delicious but wait was definitely too long and without any "sorry for the wait" mentioned by the waiters. Wouldn't go there again.
Dr Montaban (4 years ago)
It was overwhelming. Mind the gap
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